OSDN Git Service

* doc/c-tree.texi: Use @dots{} and @enddots{} where appropriate.
authorrwild <rwild@138bc75d-0d04-0410-961f-82ee72b054a4>
Sun, 17 Feb 2008 18:52:04 +0000 (18:52 +0000)
committerrwild <rwild@138bc75d-0d04-0410-961f-82ee72b054a4>
Sun, 17 Feb 2008 18:52:04 +0000 (18:52 +0000)
* doc/cfg.texi: Likewise.
* doc/extend.texi: Likewise.
* doc/gty.texi: Likewise.
* doc/invoke.texi: Likewise.
* doc/loop.texi: Likewise.
* doc/md.texi: Likewise.
* doc/passes.texi: Likewise.
* doc/rtl.texi: Likewise.
* doc/sourcebuild.texi: Likewise.
* doc/tm.texi: Likewise.
* doc/tree-ssa.texi: Likewise.

git-svn-id: svn+ssh://gcc.gnu.org/svn/gcc/trunk@132381 138bc75d-0d04-0410-961f-82ee72b054a4

13 files changed:
gcc/ChangeLog
gcc/doc/c-tree.texi
gcc/doc/cfg.texi
gcc/doc/extend.texi
gcc/doc/gty.texi
gcc/doc/invoke.texi
gcc/doc/loop.texi
gcc/doc/md.texi
gcc/doc/passes.texi
gcc/doc/rtl.texi
gcc/doc/sourcebuild.texi
gcc/doc/tm.texi
gcc/doc/tree-ssa.texi

index 2b3033e..cd44cbd 100644 (file)
@@ -1,3 +1,18 @@
+2008-02-17 Ralf Wildenhues <Ralf.Wildenhues@gmx.de>
+
+       * doc/c-tree.texi: Use @dots{} and @enddots{} where appropriate.
+       * doc/cfg.texi: Likewise.
+       * doc/extend.texi: Likewise.
+       * doc/gty.texi: Likewise.
+       * doc/invoke.texi: Likewise.
+       * doc/loop.texi: Likewise.
+       * doc/md.texi: Likewise.
+       * doc/passes.texi: Likewise.
+       * doc/rtl.texi: Likewise.
+       * doc/sourcebuild.texi: Likewise.
+       * doc/tm.texi: Likewise.
+       * doc/tree-ssa.texi: Likewise.
+
 2008-02-17  Richard Guenther  <rguenther@suse.de>
 
        PR middle-end/35227
index b2cd9e0..d727689 100644 (file)
@@ -2537,7 +2537,7 @@ tree call, arg;
 call_expr_arg_iterator iter;
 FOR_EACH_CALL_EXPR_ARG (arg, iter, call)
   /* arg is bound to successive arguments of call.  */
-  ...;
+  @dots{};
 @end smallexample
 
 For non-static
@@ -2704,7 +2704,7 @@ analysis.
 
 @item OMP_PARALLEL
 
-Represents @code{#pragma omp parallel [clause1 ... clauseN]}. It
+Represents @code{#pragma omp parallel [clause1 @dots{} clauseN]}. It
 has four operands:
 
 Operand @code{OMP_PARALLEL_BODY} is valid while in GENERIC and
@@ -2729,7 +2729,7 @@ variables.
 
 @item OMP_FOR
 
-Represents @code{#pragma omp for [clause1 ... clauseN]}.  It
+Represents @code{#pragma omp for [clause1 @dots{} clauseN]}.  It
 has 5 operands:
 
 Operand @code{OMP_FOR_BODY} contains the loop body.
@@ -2762,7 +2762,7 @@ unspecified by the standard.
 
 @item OMP_SECTIONS
 
-Represents @code{#pragma omp sections [clause1 ... clauseN]}.
+Represents @code{#pragma omp sections [clause1 @dots{} clauseN]}.
 
 Operand @code{OMP_SECTIONS_BODY} contains the sections body,
 which in turn contains a set of @code{OMP_SECTION} nodes for
index 854f352..80440af 100644 (file)
@@ -293,13 +293,13 @@ series of jumps,
 
 @smallexample
   goto *x;
-  [ ... ]
+  [ @dots{} ]
 
   goto *x;
-  [ ... ]
+  [ @dots{} ]
 
   goto *x;
-  [ ... ]
+  [ @dots{} ]
 @end smallexample
 
 @noindent
@@ -308,13 +308,13 @@ which has a much simpler flow graph:
 
 @smallexample
   goto y;
-  [ ... ]
+  [ @dots{} ]
 
   goto y;
-  [ ... ]
+  [ @dots{} ]
 
   goto y;
-  [ ... ]
+  [ @dots{} ]
 
 y:
   goto *x;
index 1d53a07..3d54307 100644 (file)
@@ -11117,7 +11117,7 @@ macros are defined.
 
 Modifies the disposition of a diagnostic.  Note that not all
 diagnostics are modifiable; at the moment only warnings (normally
-controlled by @samp{-W...}) can be controlled, and not all of them.
+controlled by @samp{-W@dots{}}) can be controlled, and not all of them.
 Use @option{-fdiagnostics-show-option} to determine which diagnostics
 are controllable and which option controls them.
 
index 3858465..2ffa151 100644 (file)
@@ -96,14 +96,14 @@ The structure that immediately contains the current structure.
 @item %0
 The outermost structure that contains the current structure.
 @item %a
-A partial expression of the form @code{[i1][i2]...} that indexes
+A partial expression of the form @code{[i1][i2]@dots{}} that indexes
 the array item currently being marked.
 @end table
 
 For instance, suppose that you have a structure of the form
 @smallexample
 struct A @{
-  ...
+  @dots{}
 @};
 struct B @{
   struct A foo[12];
index 8c91dfd..1cb14ea 100644 (file)
@@ -5012,7 +5012,7 @@ position in code.  Better debugging information is then generated
 (if the debugging information format supports this information).
 
 It is enabled by default when compiling with optimization (@option{-Os},
-@option{-O}, @option{-O2}, ...), debugging information (@option{-g}) and
+@option{-O}, @option{-O2}, @dots{}), debugging information (@option{-g}) and
 the debug info format supports it.
 
 @item -print-file-name=@var{library}
index baca8b6..52e14fa 100644 (file)
@@ -348,7 +348,7 @@ and step must be the same.  A variable has evolution
 loop) equivalent to @code{x_1} in the following example
 
 @smallexample
-while (...)
+while (@dots{})
   @{
     x_1 = phi (base, x_2);
     x_2 = x_1 + step;
index 2ef1925..bd4150f 100644 (file)
@@ -7756,7 +7756,7 @@ rtx-based construct, such as a @code{define_insn},
 The syntax for defining a mode iterator is:
 
 @smallexample
-(define_mode_iterator @var{name} [(@var{mode1} "@var{cond1}") ... (@var{moden} "@var{condn}")])
+(define_mode_iterator @var{name} [(@var{mode1} "@var{cond1}") @dots{} (@var{moden} "@var{condn}")])
 @end smallexample
 
 This allows subsequent @file{.md} file constructs to use the mode suffix
@@ -7823,7 +7823,7 @@ the mode in lower case, and @code{MODE}, which is the same thing in
 upper case.  You can define other attributes using:
 
 @smallexample
-(define_mode_attr @var{name} [(@var{mode1} "@var{value1}") ... (@var{moden} "@var{valuen}")])
+(define_mode_attr @var{name} [(@var{mode1} "@var{value1}") @dots{} (@var{moden} "@var{valuen}")])
 @end smallexample
 
 where @var{name} is the name of the attribute and @var{valuei}
@@ -7833,7 +7833,7 @@ When GCC replaces some @var{:iterator} with @var{:mode}, it will scan
 each string and mode in the pattern for sequences of the form
 @code{<@var{iterator}:@var{attr}>}, where @var{attr} is the name of a
 mode attribute.  If the attribute is defined for @var{mode}, the whole
-@code{<...>} sequence will be replaced by the appropriate attribute
+@code{<@dots{}>} sequence will be replaced by the appropriate attribute
 value.
 
 For example, suppose an @file{.md} file has:
@@ -7853,8 +7853,8 @@ Here is an example of using an attribute for a mode:
 @smallexample
 (define_mode_iterator LONG [SI DI])
 (define_mode_attr SHORT [(SI "HI") (DI "SI")])
-(define_insn ...
-  (sign_extend:LONG (match_operand:<LONG:SHORT> ...)) ...)
+(define_insn @dots{}
+  (sign_extend:LONG (match_operand:<LONG:SHORT> @dots{})) @dots{})
 @end smallexample
 
 The @code{@var{iterator}:} prefix may be omitted, in which case the
@@ -7918,7 +7918,7 @@ Code iterators operate in a similar way to mode iterators.  @xref{Mode Iterators
 The construct:
 
 @smallexample
-(define_code_iterator @var{name} [(@var{code1} "@var{cond1}") ... (@var{coden} "@var{condn}")])
+(define_code_iterator @var{name} [(@var{code1} "@var{cond1}") @dots{} (@var{coden} "@var{condn}")])
 @end smallexample
 
 defines a pseudo rtx code @var{name} that can be instantiated as
@@ -7936,7 +7936,7 @@ code in lower case, and @code{CODE}, the name of the code in upper case.
 Other attributes are defined using:
 
 @smallexample
-(define_code_attr @var{name} [(@var{code1} "@var{value1}") ... (@var{coden} "@var{valuen}")])
+(define_code_attr @var{name} [(@var{code1} "@var{value1}") @dots{} (@var{coden} "@var{valuen}")])
 @end smallexample
 
 Here's an example of code iterators in action, taken from the MIPS port:
@@ -7985,7 +7985,7 @@ This is equivalent to:
   DONE;
 @})
 
-...
+@dots{}
 @end smallexample
 
 @end ifset
index c5ec8d0..526eb76 100644 (file)
@@ -168,7 +168,7 @@ what is present is useful, and a far sight better than nothing at all.
 
 TODO: describe the global variables set up by the pass manager,
 and a brief description of how a new pass should use it.
-I need to look at what info rtl passes use first...
+I need to look at what info rtl passes use first@enddots{}
 
 @node Tree-SSA passes
 @section Tree-SSA passes
index 381ee4a..90c56d9 100644 (file)
@@ -1904,7 +1904,7 @@ declarations and during RTL generation.  It should not appear in the
 ordinary insn chain.
 
 @findex concatn
-@item (concatn@var{m} [@var{rtx} ...])
+@item (concatn@var{m} [@var{rtx} @dots{}])
 This RTX represents the concatenation of all the @var{rtx} to make a
 single value.  Like @code{concat}, this should only appear in
 declarations, and not in the insn chain.
index ebc457e..d4b7753 100644 (file)
@@ -971,7 +971,7 @@ This DejaGnu directive provides a list of compiler options, to be used
 if the target system matches @var{selector}, that replace the default
 options used for this set of tests.
 
-@item @{ dg-add-options @var{feature} ... @}
+@item @{ dg-add-options @var{feature} @dots{} @}
 Add any compiler options that are needed to access certain features.
 This directive does nothing on targets that enable the features by
 default, or that don't provide them at all.  It must come after
@@ -1463,7 +1463,7 @@ These can be overridden by defining the environment variable
 
 @smallexample
 COMPAT_OPTIONS="[list [list @{@var{tst1}@} @{@var{alt1}@}]
-  ...[list @{@var{tstn}@} @{@var{altn}@}]]"
+  @dots{}[list @{@var{tstn}@} @{@var{altn}@}]]"
 @end smallexample
 
 where @var{tsti} and @var{alti} are lists of options, with @var{tsti}
index 5207953..2c1446f 100644 (file)
@@ -3218,11 +3218,11 @@ This target hook allows the backend to emit frame-related insns that
 contain UNSPECs or UNSPEC_VOLATILEs.  The DWARF 2 call frame debugging
 info engine will invoke it on insns of the form
 @smallexample
-(set (reg) (unspec [...] UNSPEC_INDEX))
+(set (reg) (unspec [@dots{}] UNSPEC_INDEX))
 @end smallexample
 and
 @smallexample
-(set (reg) (unspec_volatile [...] UNSPECV_INDEX)).
+(set (reg) (unspec_volatile [@dots{}] UNSPECV_INDEX)).
 @end smallexample
 to let the backend emit the call frame instructions.  @var{label} is
 the CFI label attached to the insn, @var{pattern} is the pattern of
index 743ccdf..b6ba493 100644 (file)
@@ -828,7 +828,7 @@ instance, given
 @{
   int a, b, *p;
 
-  if (...)
+  if (@dots{})
     p = &a;
   else
     p = &b;
@@ -850,7 +850,7 @@ operands, use the @option{-vops} option to @option{-fdump-tree}:
 @{
   int a, b, *p;
 
-  if (...)
+  if (@dots{})
     p = &a;
   else
     p = &b;
@@ -1207,9 +1207,9 @@ all the incoming versions of the variable to create a new name
 for it.  For instance,
 
 @smallexample
-if (...)
+if (@dots{})
   a_1 = 5;
-else if (...)
+else if (@dots{})
   a_2 = 2;
 else
   a_3 = 13;
@@ -1294,11 +1294,11 @@ Suppose that we insert new names @code{x_10} and @code{x_11} (lines
      1 L0:
      2 x_1 = PHI (0, x_5)
      3 if (x_1 < 10)
-     4   x_10 = ...
+     4   x_10 = @dots{}
      5   if (x_1 > 7)
      6     y_2 = 0
      7   else
-     8     x_11 = ...
+     8     x_11 = @dots{}
      9     y_3 = x_1 + x_7
      10          endif
      11          x_5 = x_1 + 1
@@ -1390,7 +1390,7 @@ modifications should be bracketed between calls to
     munge_stmt (tree stmt)
     @{
        push_stmt_changes (&stmt);
-       ... rewrite STMT ...
+       @dots{} rewrite STMT @dots{}
        pop_stmt_changes (&stmt);
     @}
 @end smallexample
@@ -1666,7 +1666,7 @@ T, we add Vi to the may-aliases set for T@.  Meaning that
 after alias analysis, we will have:
 
 @smallexample
-may-aliases(T) = @{ V1, V2, V3, ..., Vn @}
+may-aliases(T) = @{ V1, V2, V3, @dots{}, Vn @}
 @end smallexample
 
 This means that every statement that references T, will get
@@ -1677,7 +1677,7 @@ to the alias set of all the Vi variables:
 @smallexample
 may-aliases(V1) = @{ T @}
 may-aliases(V2) = @{ T @}
-...
+@dots{}
 may-aliases(Vn) = @{ T @}
 @end smallexample