OSDN Git Service

2005-04-19 Robert Schuster <thebohemian@gmx.net>
authormkoch <mkoch@138bc75d-0d04-0410-961f-82ee72b054a4>
Tue, 19 Apr 2005 04:50:06 +0000 (04:50 +0000)
committermkoch <mkoch@138bc75d-0d04-0410-961f-82ee72b054a4>
Tue, 19 Apr 2005 04:50:06 +0000 (04:50 +0000)
* java/beans/EventHandler.java: Reworked documentation.
(invoke): Fixed behavior to match spec.

git-svn-id: svn+ssh://gcc.gnu.org/svn/gcc/trunk@98372 138bc75d-0d04-0410-961f-82ee72b054a4

libjava/ChangeLog
libjava/java/beans/EventHandler.java

index 94a8894..1aa3fc0 100644 (file)
@@ -1,3 +1,8 @@
+2005-04-19  Robert Schuster <thebohemian@gmx.net>
+
+       * java/beans/EventHandler.java: Reworked documentation.
+       (invoke): Fixed behavior to match spec.
+
 2005-04-19  Michael Koch  <konqueror@gmx.de>
 
        * java/awt/print/PrinterJob.java
index 112fbe2..e2ca141 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 /* java.beans.EventHandler
-   Copyright (C) 2004 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+   Copyright (C) 2004, 2005 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
 
 This file is part of GNU Classpath.
 
@@ -44,26 +44,18 @@ import java.lang.reflect.Method;
 import java.lang.reflect.Proxy;
 
 /**
- * class EventHandler
- *
- * EventHandler forms a bridge between dynamically created listeners and
- * arbitrary properties and methods.  The idea is that a Proxy that implements
- * a listener class calls the EventHandler when a listener method is called.
- * The Proxy calls invoke(), which dispatches the event to a method, called
- * the action, in another object, called the target.
- *
- * The event passed to the listener method is used to access a prespecified
- * property, which in turn is passed to the action method.
+ * <p>EventHandler forms a bridge between dynamically created listeners and
+ * arbitrary properties and methods.</p>
  * 
- * Normally, call EventHandler.create(), which constructs an EventHandler and
- * a Proxy for the listener interface.  When the listenerMethod gets called on
- * the proxy, it in turn calls invoke on the attached EventHandler.  The
- * invoke call extracts the bean property from the event object and passes it
- * to the action method of target object.
- *
- * TODO: Add examples of using this thing.
+ * <p>You can use this class to easily create listener implementations for
+ * some basic interactions between an event source and its target. Using
+ * the three static methods named <code>create</code> you can create
+ * these listener implementations.</p>
  * 
+ * <p>See the documentation of each method for usage examples.</p>
+ *  
  * @author Jerry Quinn (jlquinn@optonline.net)
+ * @author Robert Schuster (thebohemian@gmx.net)
  * @since 1.4
  */
 public class EventHandler implements InvocationHandler
@@ -80,6 +72,9 @@ public class EventHandler implements InvocationHandler
   // The property to extract from an event passed to listenerMethod.
   private String property;
 
+  // The target objects Class.
+  private Class targetClass;
+  
   // String class doesn't already have a capitalize routine.
   private String capitalize(String s)
   {
@@ -89,14 +84,15 @@ public class EventHandler implements InvocationHandler
   /**
    * Creates a new <code>EventHandler</code> instance.
    *
-   * Typical creation is done with the create method, not by newing an
-   * EventHandler.
+   * <p>Typical creation is done with the create method, not by knewing an
+   * EventHandler.</p>
    *
-   * This constructs an EventHandler that will connect the method
+   * <p>This constructs an EventHandler that will connect the method
    * listenerMethodName to target.action, extracting eventPropertyName from
-   * the first argument of listenerMethodName. and sending it to action.
-   *
-   *
+   * the first argument of listenerMethodName. and sending it to action.</p>
+   * 
+   * <p>Throws a <code>NullPointerException</code> if the <code>target</code>
+   * argument is <code>null</code>. 
    *
    * @param target Object that will perform the action.
    * @param action A property or method of the target.
@@ -107,14 +103,20 @@ public class EventHandler implements InvocationHandler
                      String listenerMethodName)
   {
     this.target = target;
+    
+    // Retrieving the class is done for two reasons:
+    // 1) The class object is needed very frequently in the invoke() method.
+    // 2) The constructor should throw a NullPointerException if target is null.
+    targetClass = target.getClass();
+    
     this.action = action;      // Turn this into a method or do we wait till
-                               // runtime
+               // runtime
     property = eventPropertyName;
     listenerMethod = listenerMethodName;
   }
 
   /**
-   * Return the event property name.
+   * Returns the event property name.
    */
   public String getEventPropertyName()
   {
@@ -122,7 +124,7 @@ public class EventHandler implements InvocationHandler
   }
 
   /**
-   * Return the listener's method name.
+   * Returns the listener's method name.
    */
   public String getListenerMethodName()
   {
@@ -130,7 +132,7 @@ public class EventHandler implements InvocationHandler
   }
 
   /**
-   * Return the target object.
+   * Returns the target object.
    */
   public Object getTarget()
   {
@@ -138,7 +140,7 @@ public class EventHandler implements InvocationHandler
   }
 
   /**
-   * Return the action method name.
+   * Returns the action method name.
    */
   public String getAction()
   {
@@ -156,12 +158,7 @@ public class EventHandler implements InvocationHandler
   // value will be a wrapper.  If we then take the type of the wrapper and use
   // it to locate the action method that takes the native type, it won't match.
   private Object[] getProperty(Object o, String prop)
-    throws NoSuchMethodException, IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException
   {
-    // Use the event object when the property name to extract is null.
-    if (prop == null)
-      return new Object[] {o, o.getClass()};
-
     // Isolate the first property name from a.b.c.
     int pos;
     String rest = null;
@@ -179,121 +176,287 @@ public class EventHandler implements InvocationHandler
        getter = o.getClass().getMethod("is" + capitalize(prop),
                                                 null);
       }
-    catch (NoSuchMethodException e)
+    catch (NoSuchMethodException nsme1)
       {
-       // Look for regular property getter getProperty
-       getter = o.getClass().getMethod("get" + capitalize(prop),
+        try {
+          // Look for regular property getter getProperty
+          getter = o.getClass().getMethod("get" + capitalize(prop),
                                                 null);
+        } catch(NoSuchMethodException nsme2) {
+            try {
+            // Finally look for a method of the name prop
+            getter = o.getClass().getMethod(prop, null);
+            } catch(NoSuchMethodException nsme3) {
+                // Ok, give up with an intelligent hint for the user.
+                throw new RuntimeException("Method not called: Could not find a property or method '" + prop
+                        + "' in " + o.getClass() + " while following the property argument '" + property + "'.");
+            }
+        }
       }
-    Object val = getter.invoke(o, null);
-
-    if (rest != null)
-      return getProperty(val, rest);
-
-    return new Object[] {val, getter.getReturnType()};
+    try {
+      Object val = getter.invoke(o, null);
+
+      if (rest != null)
+        return getProperty(val, rest);
+
+      return new Object[] {val, getter.getReturnType()};
+    } catch(InvocationTargetException ite) {
+        throw new RuntimeException("Method not called: Property or method '" + prop + "' has thrown an exception.", ite);
+    } catch(IllegalAccessException iae) {
+        // This cannot happen because we looked up method with Class.getMethod()
+        // which returns public methods only.
+        throw (InternalError) new InternalError("Non-public method was invoked.").initCause(iae);
+    }
   }
 
-
   /**
-   * Invoke the event handler.
-   *
-   * Proxy is the object that was used, method is the method that was invoked
-   * on object, and arguments is the set of arguments passed to this method.
-   * We assume that the first argument is the event to extract a property
-   * from.
-   *
-   * Assuming that method matches the listener method specified when creating
-   * this EventHandler, the desired property is extracted from this argument.
-   * The property is passed to target.setAction(), if possible.  Otherwise
-   * target.action() is called, where action is the string fed to the
-   * constructor.
-   *
-   * For now we punt on indexed properties.  Sun docs are not clear to me
-   * about this.
-   *
-   * @param proxy The proxy object that had method invoked on it.
-   * @param method The method that was invoked.
-   * @param arguments Arguments to method.
-   * @return Result of invoking target.action on the event property
+   * Invokes the <code>EventHandler</code>.
+   * 
+   * <p>This method is normally called by the listener's proxy implementation.</p>
+   * 
+   * @param proxy The listener interface that is implemented using
+   * the proxy mechanism.
+   * @param method The method that was called on the proxy instance.
+   * @param arguments The arguments which where given to the method.
+   * @throws Throwable <code>NoSuchMethodException</code> is thrown when the EventHandler's
+   * action method or property cannot be found.
    */
   public Object invoke(Object proxy, Method method, Object[] arguments)
-    throws Exception
   {
-    // Do we actually need the proxy?
-    if (method == null)
-      throw new RuntimeException("Invoking null method");
+      try {
+      // The method instance of the target object. We have to find out which
+      // one we have to invoke.
+      Method actionMethod = null;
 
     // Listener methods that weren't specified are ignored.  If listenerMethod
     // is null, then all listener methods are processed.
     if (listenerMethod != null && !method.getName().equals(listenerMethod))
       return null;
 
-    // Extract the first arg from arguments and do getProperty on arg
-    if (arguments == null || arguments.length == 0)
-      return null;
-    Object event = arguments[0]; // We hope :-)
-
-    // Obtain the property XXX propertyType keeps showing up null - why?
-    // because the object inside getProperty changes, but the ref variable
-    // can't change this way, dolt!  need a better way to get both values out
-    // - need method and object to do the invoke and get return type
-    Object v[] = getProperty(event, property);
-    Object val = v[0];
-    Class propertyType = (Class) v[1];
-
-    // Find the actual method of target to invoke.  We can't do this in the
-    // constructor since we don't know the type of the property we extracted
-    // from the event then.
-    //
-    // action can be either a property or a method.  Sun's docs seem to imply
-    // that action should be treated as a property first, and then a method,
-    // but don't specifically say it.
-    //
-    // XXX check what happens with native type wrappers.  The better thing to
-    // do is look at the return type of the method
-    Method actionMethod;
-    try
+    // If a property is defined we definitely need a valid object at
+    // arguments[0] that can be used to retrieve a value to which the
+    // property of the target gets set.
+    if(property != null) {
+      // Extracts the argument. We will let it fail with a NullPointerException
+      // the caller used a listener method that has no arguments.
+      Object event = arguments[0];
+
+      // Obtains the property XXX propertyType keeps showing up null - why?
+      // because the object inside getProperty changes, but the ref variable
+      // can't change this way, dolt!  need a better way to get both values out
+      // - need method and object to do the invoke and get return type
+      Object v[] = getProperty(event, property);
+      Object[] args = new Object[] { v[0] };
+      
+      // Changes the class array that controls which method signature we are going
+      // to look up in the target object.
+      Class[] argTypes = new Class[] { initClass((Class) v[1]) };
+    
+      // Tries to  find a setter method to which we can apply the
+      while(argTypes[0] != null) {
+      try
       {
-       // Look for a property setter for action.
-       actionMethod = 
-         target.getClass().getMethod("set" + capitalize(action),
-                                     new Class[] {propertyType});
+        // Look for a property setter for action.
+        actionMethod = targetClass.getMethod("set" + capitalize(action), argTypes);
+
+        return actionMethod.invoke(target, args);
       }
     catch (NoSuchMethodException e)
       {
-       // If action as property didn't work, try as method.
-       try
-         {
-           actionMethod = 
-             target.getClass().getMethod(action, new Class[] {propertyType});
-         }
-       catch (NoSuchMethodException e1)
-         {
-           // When event property is null, we may call action with no args
-           if (property == null)
-             {
-               actionMethod =
-                 target.getClass().getMethod(action, null);
-               return actionMethod.invoke(target, null);
-             }
-           else
-             throw e1;
-         }
+        // If action as property didn't work, try as method later.
+      }
+    
+      argTypes[0] = nextClass(argTypes[0]);
+      }
+      
+      // We could not find a suitable setter method. Now we try again interpreting
+      // action as the method name itself.
+      // Since we probably have changed the block local argTypes array 
+      // we need to rebuild it.
+      argTypes = new Class[] { initClass((Class) v[1]) };
+    
+      // Tries to  find a setter method to which we can apply the
+      while(argTypes[0] != null) {
+        try
+        {
+          actionMethod = targetClass.getMethod(action, argTypes);
+
+          return actionMethod.invoke(target, args);
+        }
+        catch (NoSuchMethodException e)
+        {
+        }
+        
+        argTypes[0] = nextClass(argTypes[0]);
+      }
+        
+        throw new RuntimeException("Method not called: Could not find a public method named '"
+                + action + "' in target " + targetClass + " which takes a '"
+                + v[1] + "' argument or a property of this type.");
+      }      
+  
+    // If property was null we will search for a no-argument method here.
+    // Note: The ordering of method lookups is important because we want to prefer no-argument
+    // calls like the JDK does. This means if we have actionMethod() and actionMethod(Event) we will
+    // call the first *EVEN* if we have a valid argument for the second method. This is behavior compliant
+    // to the JDK.
+    // If actionMethod() is not available but there is a actionMethod(Event) we take this. That makes us
+    // more specification compliant than the JDK itself because this one will fail in such a case.
+    try
+      {
+      actionMethod = targetClass.getMethod(action, null);
+      }
+    catch(NoSuchMethodException nsme)
+      {
+        // Note: If we want to be really strict the specification says that a no-argument method should
+        // accept an EventObject (or subclass I guess). However since the official implementation is broken
+        // anyways, it's more flexible without the EventObject restriction and we are compatible on everything
+        // else this can stay this way.
+        if(arguments != null && arguments.length >= 1/* && arguments[0] instanceof EventObject*/) {
+            Class[] targetArgTypes = new Class[] { initClass(arguments[0].getClass()) };
+            
+            while(targetArgTypes[0] != null) {
+                try
+                {
+                  // If no property exists we expect the first element of the arguments to be
+                  // an EventObject which is then applied to the target method.
+      
+                  actionMethod = targetClass.getMethod(action, targetArgTypes);
+              
+                  return actionMethod.invoke(target, new Object[] { arguments[0] });
+                }
+                catch(NoSuchMethodException nsme2)
+                {
+                    
+                }
+                
+                targetArgTypes[0] = nextClass(targetArgTypes[0]);
+            }
+          
+        }
       }
 
+    // If we do not have a Method instance at this point this means that all our tries
+    // failed. The JDK throws an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException in this case.
+    if(actionMethod == null)
+      throw new ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException(0);
+    
     // Invoke target.action(property)
-    return actionMethod.invoke(target, new Object[] {val});
+    return actionMethod.invoke(target, null);
+      } catch(InvocationTargetException ite) {
+         throw new RuntimeException(ite.getCause());
+      } catch(IllegalAccessException iae) {
+          // Cannot happen because we always use getMethod() which returns public
+          // methods only. Otherwise there is something seriously broken in
+          // GNU Classpath.
+          throw (InternalError) new InternalError("Non-public method was invoked.").initCause(iae);
+      }
+  }
+  
+  /**
+   * <p>Returns the primitive type for every wrapper class or the
+   * class itself if it is no wrapper class.</p>
+   * 
+   * <p>This is needed because to be able to find both kinds of methods:
+   * One that takes a wrapper class as the first argument and one that
+   * accepts a primitive instead.</p>
+   */
+  private Class initClass(Class klass) {
+   if(klass == Boolean.class) {
+    return Boolean.TYPE;    
+   } else if(klass == Byte.class) {
+    return Byte.TYPE;   
+   } else if(klass == Short.class) {
+    return Short.TYPE;   
+   } else if(klass == Integer.class) {
+    return Integer.TYPE;   
+   } else if(klass == Long.class) {
+    return Long.TYPE;   
+   } else if(klass == Float.class) {
+    return Float.TYPE;   
+   } else if(klass == Double.class) {
+    return Double.TYPE;   
+   } else {
+    return klass;   
+   }
   }
 
   /**
-   * Construct a new object to dispatch events.
-   *
-   * Equivalent to:
-   * create(listenerInterface, target, action, null, null)
+   * 
+   * 
+   * @param klass
+   * @return
+   */
+  private Class nextClass(Class klass) {
+    if(klass == Boolean.TYPE) {
+    return Boolean.class;    
+   } else if(klass == Byte.TYPE) {
+    return Byte.class;   
+   } else if(klass == Short.TYPE) {
+    return Short.class;   
+   } else if(klass == Integer.TYPE) {
+    return Integer.class;   
+   } else if(klass == Long.TYPE) {
+    return Long.class;   
+   } else if(klass == Float.TYPE) {
+    return Float.class;   
+   } else if(klass == Double.TYPE) {
+    return Double.class;   
+   } else {
+    return klass.getSuperclass();
+   }
+   }
+  
+  /**
+   * <p>Constructs an implementation of <code>listenerInterface</code>
+   * to dispatch events.</p>
+   * 
+   * <p>You can use such an implementation to simply call a public
+   * no-argument method of an arbitrary target object or to forward
+   * the first argument of the listener method to the target method.</p>
+   * 
+   * <p>Call this method like:</p>
+   * <code>
+   * button.addActionListener((ActionListener)
+   *    EventHandler.create(ActionListener.class, target, "dispose"));
+   * </code>
+   * 
+   * <p>to achieve the following behavior:</p>
+   * <code>
+   * button.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
+   *    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae) {
+   *        target.dispose();
+   *    }
+   * });
+   * </code>
+   * 
+   * <p>That means if you need a listener implementation that simply calls a
+   * a no-argument method on a given instance for <strong>each</strong>
+   * method of the listener interface.</p>
+   * 
+   * <p>Note: The <code>action</code> is interpreted as a method name. If your target object
+   * has no no-argument method of the given name the EventHandler tries to find
+   * a method with the same name but which can accept the first argument of the
+   * listener method. Usually this will be an event object but any other object
+   * will be forwarded, too. Keep in mind that using a property name instead of a
+   * real method here is wrong and will throw an <code>ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException</code>
+   * whenever one of the listener methods is called.<p/>
    *
-   * I.e. all listenerInterface methods are mapped to
-   * target.action(EventObject) or target.action(), if the first doesn't
-   * exist.
+   * <p>The <code>EventHandler</code> will automatically convert primitives
+   * to their wrapper class and vice versa. Furthermore it will call
+   * a target method if it accepts a superclass of the type of the
+   * first argument of the listener method.</p>
+   * 
+   * <p>In case that the method of the target object throws an exception
+   * it will be wrapped in a <code>RuntimeException</code> and thrown out
+   * of the listener method.</p>
+   * 
+   * <p>In case that the method of the target object cannot be found an
+   * <code>ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException</code> will be thrown when the
+   * listener method is invoked.</p>
+   * 
+   * <p>A call to this method is equivalent to:
+   * <code>create(listenerInterface, target, action, null, null)</code></p>
    *
    * @param listenerInterface Listener interface to implement.
    * @param target Object to invoke action on.
@@ -306,14 +469,82 @@ public class EventHandler implements InvocationHandler
   }
 
   /**
-   * Construct a new object to dispatch events.
+   * <p>Constructs an implementation of <code>listenerInterface</code>
+   * to dispatch events.</p>
    *
-   * Equivalent to:
-   * create(listenerInterface, target, action, eventPropertyName, null)
+   * <p>Use this method if you want to create an implementation that retrieves
+   * a property value from the <b>first</b> argument of the listener method
+   * and applies it to the target's property or method. This first argument
+   * of the listener is usually an event object but any other object is
+   * valid, too.</p>
+   * 
+   * <p>You can set the value of <code>eventPropertyName</code> to "prop"
+   * to denote the retrieval of a property named "prop" from the event
+   * object. In case that no such property exists the <code>EventHandler</code>
+   * will try to find a method with that name.</p>
+   * 
+   * <p>If you set <code>eventPropertyName</code> to a value like this "a.b.c"
+   * <code>EventHandler</code> will recursively evaluate the properties "a", "b"
+   * and "c". Again if no property can be found the <code>EventHandler</code>
+   * tries a method name instead. This allows mixing the names, too: "a.toString"
+   * will retrieve the property "a" from the event object and will then call
+   * the method "toString" on it.</p>
+   * 
+   * <p>An exception thrown in any of these methods will provoke a
+   * <code>RuntimeException</code> to be thrown which contains an
+   * <code>InvocationTargetException</code> containing the triggering exception.</p>
+   * 
+   * <p>If you set <code>eventPropertyName</code> to a non-null value the
+   * <code>action</code> parameter will be interpreted as a property name
+   * or a method name of the target object.</p>
+   *   
+   * <p>Any object retrieved from the event object and applied to the
+   * target will converted from primitives to their wrapper class or
+   * vice versa or applied to a method that accepts a superclass
+   * of the object.</p>
    *
-   * I.e. all listenerInterface methods are mapped to
-   * target.action(event.getEventPropertyName)
+   * <p>Examples:</p>
+   * <p>The following code:</p><code>
+   * button.addActionListener(
+   *    new ActionListener() {
+   *        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae) {
+   *            Object o = ae.getSource().getClass().getName();
+   *            textField.setText((String) o);
+   *        }
+   *    });
+   * </code>
+   * 
+   * <p>Can be expressed using the <code>EventHandler</code> like this:</p>
+   * <p>
+   * <code>button.addActionListener((ActionListener)
+   *    EventHandler.create(ActionListener.class, textField, "text", "source.class.name");
+   * <code>
+   * </p>
+   * 
+   * <p>As said above you can specify the target as a method, too:</p>
+   * <p>
+   * <code>button.addActionListener((ActionListener)
+   *    EventHandler.create(ActionListener.class, textField, "setText", "source.class.name");
+   * <code>
+   * </p>
+   * 
+   * <p>Furthermore you can use method names in the property:</p>
+   * <p>
+   * <code>button.addActionListener((ActionListener)
+   *    EventHandler.create(ActionListener.class, textField, "setText", "getSource.getClass.getName");
+   * <code>
+   * </p>
    * 
+   * <p>Finally you can mix names:</p>
+   * <p>
+   * <code>button.addActionListener((ActionListener)
+   *    EventHandler.create(ActionListener.class, textField, "setText", "source.getClass.name");
+   * <code>
+   * </p>
+   * 
+   * <p>A call to this method is equivalent to:
+   * <code>create(listenerInterface, target, action, null, null)</code>
+   * </p>
    *
    * @param listenerInterface Listener interface to implement.
    * @param target Object to invoke action on.
@@ -327,41 +558,27 @@ public class EventHandler implements InvocationHandler
     return create(listenerInterface, target, action, eventPropertyName, null);
   }
 
-
   /**
-   * Construct a new object to dispatch events.
-   *
-   * This creates an object that acts as a proxy for the method
-   * listenerMethodName in listenerInterface.  When the listener method is
-   * activated, the object extracts eventPropertyName from the event.  Then it
-   * passes the property to the method target.setAction, or target.action if
-   * action is not a property with a setter.
-   *
-   * For example, EventHandler.create(MouseListener.class, test, "pushed",
-   * "button", "mouseClicked") generates a proxy object that implements
-   * MouseListener, at least for the method mouseClicked().  The other methods
-   * of MouseListener are null operations.  When mouseClicked is invoked, the
-   * generated object extracts the button property from the MouseEvent,
-   * i.e. event.getButton(), and calls test.setPushed() with the result.  So under
-   * the covers the following happens:
+   * <p>Constructs an implementation of <code>listenerInterface</code>
+   * to dispatch events.</p>
    *
-   * <CODE>
-   * object.mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) { test.setPushed(e.getButton()); }
-   * </CODE>
-   *
-   * The Sun spec specifies a hierarchical property naming scheme.  Generally
-   * if the property is a.b.c, this corresponds to event.getA().getB().getC()
-   * or event.getA().getB().isC().  I don't see how you specify an indexed
-   * property, though.  This may be a limitation of the Sun implementation as
-   * well.  The spec doesn't seem to address it.
+   * <p>Besides the functionality described for {@link create(Class, Object, String)}
+   * and {@link create(Class, Object, String, String)} this method allows you
+   * to filter the listener method that should have an effect. Look at these
+   * method's documentation for more information about the <code>EventHandler</code>'s
+   * usage.</p>
    * 
-   * If eventPropertyName is null, EventHandler instead uses the event object
-   * in place of a property, i.e. it calls target.action(EventObject).  If
-   * there is no method named action taking an EventObject argument,
-   * EventHandler looks for a method target.action() taking no arguments.
-   *
-   * If listenerMethodName is null, every method in listenerInterface gets
-   * mapped to target.action, rather than the specified listener method.
+   * <p>If you want to call <code>dispose</code> on a <code>JFrame</code> instance
+   * when the <code>WindowListener.windowClosing()</code> method was invoked use
+   * the following code:</p>
+   * <p>
+   * <code>
+   * EventHandler.create(WindowListener.class, jframeInstance, "dispose", null, "windowClosing");
+   * </code>
+   * </p>
+   * 
+   * <p>A <code>NullPointerException</code> is thrown if the <code>listenerInterface</code>
+   * or <code>target</code> argument are <code>null</code>.
    * 
    * @param listenerInterface Listener interface to implement.
    * @param target Object to invoke action on.