OSDN Git Service

In libobjc/:
[pf3gnuchains/gcc-fork.git] / libobjc / objc / objc.h
1 /* Basic data types for Objective C.
2    Copyright (C) 1993, 1995, 1996, 2004, 2009, 
3    2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
4
5 This file is part of GCC.
6
7 GCC is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
8 it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
9 the Free Software Foundation; either version 3, or (at your option)
10 any later version.
11
12 GCC is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
13 but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
14 MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
15 GNU General Public License for more details.
16
17 Under Section 7 of GPL version 3, you are granted additional
18 permissions described in the GCC Runtime Library Exception, version
19 3.1, as published by the Free Software Foundation.
20
21 You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License and
22 a copy of the GCC Runtime Library Exception along with this program;
23 see the files COPYING3 and COPYING.RUNTIME respectively.  If not, see
24 <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.  */
25
26 #ifndef __objc_INCLUDE_GNU
27 #define __objc_INCLUDE_GNU
28
29 /* This file contains the definition of the basic types used by the
30    Objective-C language.  It needs to be included to do almost
31    anything with Objective-C.
32 */
33
34 #ifdef __cplusplus
35 extern "C" {
36 #endif
37
38 #include <stddef.h>
39
40 /* The current version of the GNU Objective-C Runtime library in
41    compressed ISO date format.  This should be updated any time a new
42    version is released with changes to the public API (there is no
43    need to update it if there were no API changes since the previous
44    release).  This macro is only defined starting with the GNU
45    Objective-C Runtime shipped with GCC 4.6.0.  If it is not defined,
46    it is either an older version of the runtime, or another runtime.
47 */
48 #define __GNU_LIBOBJC__ 20100911
49
50 /*
51   Definition of the boolean type.
52
53   Compatibility note: the Apple/NeXT runtime defines a BOOL as a
54   'signed char'.  The GNU runtime uses an 'unsigned char'.
55
56   Important: this could change and we could switch to 'typedef bool
57   BOOL' in the future.  Do not depend on the type of BOOL.
58 */
59 #undef BOOL
60 typedef unsigned char  BOOL;
61
62 #define YES   (BOOL)1
63 #define NO    (BOOL)0
64
65 /* The basic Objective-C types (SEL, Class, id) are defined as pointer
66    to opaque structures.  The details of the structures are private to
67    the runtime and may potentially change from one version to the
68    other.
69 */
70
71 /* A SEL (selector) represents an abstract method (in the
72    object-oriented sense) and includes all the details of how to
73    invoke the method (which means its name, arguments and return
74    types) but provides no implementation of its own.  You can check
75    whether a class implements a selector or not, and if you have a
76    selector and know that the class implements it, you can use it to
77    call the method for an object in the class.
78  */
79 typedef const struct objc_selector *SEL;
80 #include "deprecated/struct_objc_selector.h"
81
82 /* A Class is a class (in the object-oriented sense).  In Objective-C
83    there is the complication that each Class is an object itself, and
84    so belongs to a class too.  This class that a class belongs to is
85    called its 'meta class'.
86 */
87 typedef struct objc_class *Class;
88 #include "deprecated/MetaClass.h"
89 #include "deprecated/struct_objc_class.h"
90
91 /* An 'id' is an object of an unknown class.  The struct objc_object
92    is private and what you see here is only the beginning of the
93    struct.  In theory, the fact that 'class_pointer' is public means
94    that if you have any object 'object', you can immediately get its
95    class by using '((id)object)->class_pointer', but this is not
96    recommended; you should use object_get_class(object) instead.
97 */
98 typedef struct objc_object
99 {
100   /* 'class_pointer' is the Class that the object belongs to.  In case
101      of a Class object, this pointer points to the meta class.  */
102   /* Note that the Apple/NeXT runtime calls this variable 'isa'.
103      TODO: Decide if we want to call it 'isa' too.  TODO: Why not
104      simply hide this pointer and force users to use the proper API to
105      get it ?
106   */
107   Class class_pointer;
108 } *id;
109
110 /*
111   'IMP' is a C function that implements a method.  When retrieving the
112   implementation of a method from the runtime, this is the type of the
113   pointer returned.  The idea of the definition of IMP is to represent
114   a 'pointer to a general function taking an id, a SEL, followed by
115   other unspecified arguments'.  You must always cast an IMP to a
116   pointer to a function taking the appropriate, specific types for
117   that function, before calling it - to make sure the appropriate
118   arguments are passed to it.  The code generated by the compiler to
119   perform method calls automatically does this cast inside method
120   calls.
121 */
122 typedef id (*IMP)(id, SEL, ...); 
123
124 /* 'nil' is the null object.  Messages to nil do nothing and always
125    return 0.  */
126 #define nil (id)0
127
128 /* 'Nil' is the null class.  Since classes are objects too, this is
129    actually the same object as 'nil' (and behaves in the same way),
130    but it has a type of Class, so it is good to use it instead of
131    'nil' if you are comparing a Class object to nil as it enables the
132    compiler to do some type-checking.  */
133 #define Nil (Class)0
134
135 #include "deprecated/STR.h"
136
137 /* TODO: Move the 'Protocol' declaration into objc/runtime.h.  A
138    Protocol is simply an object, not a basic Objective-C type.  The
139    Apple runtime defines Protocol in objc/runtime.h too, so it's good
140    to move it there for API compatibility.
141 */
142
143 /* A 'Protocol' is a formally defined list of selectors (normally
144    created using the @protocol Objective-C syntax).  It is mostly used
145    at compile-time to check that classes implement all the methods
146    that they are supposed to.  Protocols are also available in the
147    runtime system as Protocol objects.
148  */
149 #ifndef __OBJC__
150   /* Once we stop including the deprecated struct_objc_protocol.h
151      there is no reason to even define a 'struct objc_protocol'.  As
152      all the structure details will be hidden, a Protocol basically is
153      simply an object (as it should be).
154    */
155   /* typedef struct objc_object Protocol; */
156   #include "deprecated/struct_objc_protocol.h"
157 #else /* __OBJC__ */
158   @class Protocol;
159 #endif 
160
161 /* Deprecated include - here temporarily, for backwards-compatibility
162    as reval_t, apply_t, arglist_t and objc_msg_lookup() used to be
163    defined here.  */
164 #include "message.h"
165
166 /* Compatibility note: the Apple/NeXT runtime defines sel_getName(),
167    sel_registerName(), object_getClassName(), object_getIndexedIvars()
168    in this file while the GNU runtime defines them in runtime.h.
169
170    The reason the GNU runtime does not define them here is that they
171    are not basic Objective-C types (defined in this file), but are
172    part of the runtime API (defined in runtime.h).
173 */
174
175 #ifdef __cplusplus
176 }
177 #endif
178
179 #endif /* not __objc_INCLUDE_GNU */