OSDN Git Service

edb61b13f26a45d119078b2eb66f967018f835eb
[pf3gnuchains/gcc-fork.git] / gcc / doc / sourcebuild.texi
1 @c Copyright (C) 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
2 @c This is part of the GCC manual.
3 @c For copying conditions, see the file gcc.texi.
4
5 @node Source Tree
6 @chapter Source Tree Structure and Build System
7
8 This chapter describes the structure of the GCC source tree, and how
9 GCC is built.  The user documentation for building and installing GCC
10 is in a separate manual (@uref{http://gcc.gnu.org/install/}), with
11 which it is presumed that you are familiar.
12
13 @menu
14 * Configure Terms:: Configuration terminology and history.
15 * Top Level::       The top level source directory.
16 * gcc Directory::   The @file{gcc} subdirectory.
17 * Testsuites::      The GCC testsuites.
18 @end menu
19
20 @include configterms.texi
21
22 @node Top Level
23 @section Top Level Source Directory
24
25 The top level source directory in a GCC distribution contains several
26 files and directories that are shared with other software
27 distributions such as that of GNU Binutils.  It also contains several
28 subdirectories that contain parts of GCC and its runtime libraries:
29
30 @table @file
31 @item boehm-gc
32 The Boehm conservative garbage collector, used as part of the Java
33 runtime library.
34
35 @item contrib
36 Contributed scripts that may be found useful in conjunction with GCC@.
37 One of these, @file{contrib/texi2pod.pl}, is used to generate man
38 pages from Texinfo manuals as part of the GCC build process.
39
40 @item fastjar
41 An implementation of the @command{jar} command, used with the Java
42 front end.
43
44 @item gcc
45 The main sources of GCC itself (except for runtime libraries),
46 including optimizers, support for different target architectures,
47 language front ends, and testsuites.  @xref{gcc Directory, , The
48 @file{gcc} Subdirectory}, for details.
49
50 @item include
51 Headers for the @code{libiberty} library.
52
53 @item libada
54 The Ada runtime library.
55
56 @item libcpp
57 The C preprocessor library.
58
59 @item libgfortran
60 The Fortran runtime library.
61
62 @item libffi
63 The @code{libffi} library, used as part of the Java runtime library.
64
65 @item libiberty
66 The @code{libiberty} library, used for portability and for some
67 generally useful data structures and algorithms.  @xref{Top, ,
68 Introduction, libiberty, @sc{gnu} libiberty}, for more information
69 about this library.
70
71 @item libjava
72 The Java runtime library.
73
74 @item libmudflap
75 The @code{libmudflap} library, used for instrumenting pointer and array
76 dereferencing operations.
77
78 @item libobjc
79 The Objective-C and Objective-C++ runtime library.
80
81 @item libstdc++-v3
82 The C++ runtime library.
83
84 @item maintainer-scripts
85 Scripts used by the @code{gccadmin} account on @code{gcc.gnu.org}.
86
87 @item zlib
88 The @code{zlib} compression library, used by the Java front end and as
89 part of the Java runtime library.
90 @end table
91
92 The build system in the top level directory, including how recursion
93 into subdirectories works and how building runtime libraries for
94 multilibs is handled, is documented in a separate manual, included
95 with GNU Binutils.  @xref{Top, , GNU configure and build system,
96 configure, The GNU configure and build system}, for details.
97
98 @node gcc Directory
99 @section The @file{gcc} Subdirectory
100
101 The @file{gcc} directory contains many files that are part of the C
102 sources of GCC, other files used as part of the configuration and
103 build process, and subdirectories including documentation and a
104 testsuite.  The files that are sources of GCC are documented in a
105 separate chapter.  @xref{Passes, , Passes and Files of the Compiler}.
106
107 @menu
108 * Subdirectories:: Subdirectories of @file{gcc}.
109 * Configuration::  The configuration process, and the files it uses.
110 * Build::          The build system in the @file{gcc} directory.
111 * Makefile::       Targets in @file{gcc/Makefile}.
112 * Library Files::  Library source files and headers under @file{gcc/}.
113 * Headers::        Headers installed by GCC.
114 * Documentation::  Building documentation in GCC.
115 * Front End::      Anatomy of a language front end.
116 * Back End::       Anatomy of a target back end.
117 @end menu
118
119 @node Subdirectories
120 @subsection Subdirectories of @file{gcc}
121
122 The @file{gcc} directory contains the following subdirectories:
123
124 @table @file
125 @item @var{language}
126 Subdirectories for various languages.  Directories containing a file
127 @file{config-lang.in} are language subdirectories.  The contents of
128 the subdirectories @file{cp} (for C++), @file{objc} (for Objective-C)
129 and @file{objcp} (for Objective-C++) are documented in this manual
130 (@pxref{Passes, , Passes and Files of the Compiler}); those for other
131 languages are not.  @xref{Front End, , Anatomy of a Language Front End},
132 for details of the files in these directories.
133
134 @item config
135 Configuration files for supported architectures and operating
136 systems.  @xref{Back End, , Anatomy of a Target Back End}, for
137 details of the files in this directory.
138
139 @item doc
140 Texinfo documentation for GCC, together with automatically generated
141 man pages and support for converting the installation manual to
142 HTML@.  @xref{Documentation}.
143
144 @item fixinc
145 The support for fixing system headers to work with GCC@.  See
146 @file{fixinc/README} for more information.  The headers fixed by this
147 mechanism are installed in @file{@var{libsubdir}/include}.  Along with
148 those headers, @file{README-fixinc} is also installed, as
149 @file{@var{libsubdir}/include/README}.
150
151 @item ginclude
152 System headers installed by GCC, mainly those required by the C
153 standard of freestanding implementations.  @xref{Headers, , Headers
154 Installed by GCC}, for details of when these and other headers are
155 installed.
156
157 @item intl
158 GNU @code{libintl}, from GNU @code{gettext}, for systems which do not
159 include it in libc.  Properly, this directory should be at top level,
160 parallel to the @file{gcc} directory.
161
162 @item po
163 Message catalogs with translations of messages produced by GCC into
164 various languages, @file{@var{language}.po}.  This directory also
165 contains @file{gcc.pot}, the template for these message catalogues,
166 @file{exgettext}, a wrapper around @command{gettext} to extract the
167 messages from the GCC sources and create @file{gcc.pot}, which is run
168 by @samp{make gcc.pot}, and @file{EXCLUDES}, a list of files from
169 which messages should not be extracted.
170
171 @item testsuite
172 The GCC testsuites (except for those for runtime libraries).
173 @xref{Testsuites}.
174 @end table
175
176 @node Configuration
177 @subsection Configuration in the @file{gcc} Directory
178
179 The @file{gcc} directory is configured with an Autoconf-generated
180 script @file{configure}.  The @file{configure} script is generated
181 from @file{configure.ac} and @file{aclocal.m4}.  From the files
182 @file{configure.ac} and @file{acconfig.h}, Autoheader generates the
183 file @file{config.in}.  The file @file{cstamp-h.in} is used as a
184 timestamp.
185
186 @menu
187 * Config Fragments::     Scripts used by @file{configure}.
188 * System Config::        The @file{config.build}, @file{config.host}, and
189                          @file{config.gcc} files.
190 * Configuration Files::  Files created by running @file{configure}.
191 @end menu
192
193 @node Config Fragments
194 @subsubsection Scripts Used by @file{configure}
195
196 @file{configure} uses some other scripts to help in its work:
197
198 @itemize @bullet
199 @item The standard GNU @file{config.sub} and @file{config.guess}
200 files, kept in the top level directory, are used.  FIXME: when is the
201 @file{config.guess} file in the @file{gcc} directory (that just calls
202 the top level one) used?
203
204 @item The file @file{config.gcc} is used to handle configuration
205 specific to the particular target machine.  The file
206 @file{config.build} is used to handle configuration specific to the
207 particular build machine.  The file @file{config.host} is used to handle
208 configuration specific to the particular host machine.  (In general,
209 these should only be used for features that cannot reasonably be tested in
210 Autoconf feature tests.)
211 @xref{System Config, , The @file{config.build}; @file{config.host};
212 and @file{config.gcc} Files}, for details of the contents of these files.
213
214 @item Each language subdirectory has a file
215 @file{@var{language}/config-lang.in} that is used for
216 front-end-specific configuration.  @xref{Front End Config, , The Front
217 End @file{config-lang.in} File}, for details of this file.
218
219 @item A helper script @file{configure.frag} is used as part of
220 creating the output of @file{configure}.
221 @end itemize
222
223 @node System Config
224 @subsubsection The @file{config.build}; @file{config.host}; and @file{config.gcc} Files
225
226 The @file{config.build} file contains specific rules for particular systems
227 which GCC is built on.  This should be used as rarely as possible, as the
228 behavior of the build system can always be detected by autoconf.
229
230 The @file{config.host} file contains specific rules for particular systems
231 which GCC will run on.  This is rarely needed.
232
233 The @file{config.gcc} file contains specific rules for particular systems
234 which GCC will generate code for.  This is usually needed.
235
236 Each file has a list of the shell variables it sets, with descriptions, at the
237 top of the file.
238
239 FIXME: document the contents of these files, and what variables should
240 be set to control build, host and target configuration.
241
242 @include configfiles.texi
243
244 @node Build
245 @subsection Build System in the @file{gcc} Directory
246
247 FIXME: describe the build system, including what is built in what
248 stages.  Also list the various source files that are used in the build
249 process but aren't source files of GCC itself and so aren't documented
250 below (@pxref{Passes}).
251
252 @include makefile.texi
253
254 @node Library Files
255 @subsection Library Source Files and Headers under the @file{gcc} Directory
256
257 FIXME: list here, with explanation, all the C source files and headers
258 under the @file{gcc} directory that aren't built into the GCC
259 executable but rather are part of runtime libraries and object files,
260 such as @file{crtstuff.c} and @file{unwind-dw2.c}.  @xref{Headers, ,
261 Headers Installed by GCC}, for more information about the
262 @file{ginclude} directory.
263
264 @node Headers
265 @subsection Headers Installed by GCC
266
267 In general, GCC expects the system C library to provide most of the
268 headers to be used with it.  However, GCC will fix those headers if
269 necessary to make them work with GCC, and will install some headers
270 required of freestanding implementations.  These headers are installed
271 in @file{@var{libsubdir}/include}.  Headers for non-C runtime
272 libraries are also installed by GCC; these are not documented here.
273 (FIXME: document them somewhere.)
274
275 Several of the headers GCC installs are in the @file{ginclude}
276 directory.  These headers, @file{iso646.h},
277 @file{stdarg.h}, @file{stdbool.h}, and @file{stddef.h},
278 are installed in @file{@var{libsubdir}/include},
279 unless the target Makefile fragment (@pxref{Target Fragment})
280 overrides this by setting @code{USER_H}.
281
282 In addition to these headers and those generated by fixing system
283 headers to work with GCC, some other headers may also be installed in
284 @file{@var{libsubdir}/include}.  @file{config.gcc} may set
285 @code{extra_headers}; this specifies additional headers under
286 @file{config} to be installed on some systems.
287
288 GCC installs its own version of @code{<float.h>}, from @file{ginclude/float.h}.
289 This is done to cope with command-line options that change the
290 representation of floating point numbers.
291
292 GCC also installs its own version of @code{<limits.h>}; this is generated
293 from @file{glimits.h}, together with @file{limitx.h} and
294 @file{limity.h} if the system also has its own version of
295 @code{<limits.h>}.  (GCC provides its own header because it is
296 required of ISO C freestanding implementations, but needs to include
297 the system header from its own header as well because other standards
298 such as POSIX specify additional values to be defined in
299 @code{<limits.h>}.)  The system's @code{<limits.h>} header is used via
300 @file{@var{libsubdir}/include/syslimits.h}, which is copied from
301 @file{gsyslimits.h} if it does not need fixing to work with GCC; if it
302 needs fixing, @file{syslimits.h} is the fixed copy.
303
304 @node Documentation
305 @subsection Building Documentation
306
307 The main GCC documentation is in the form of manuals in Texinfo
308 format.  These are installed in Info format, and DVI versions may be
309 generated by @samp{make dvi} and HTML versions may be generated by
310 @command{make html}.  In addition, some man pages are
311 generated from the Texinfo manuals, there are some other text files
312 with miscellaneous documentation, and runtime libraries have their own
313 documentation outside the @file{gcc} directory.  FIXME: document the
314 documentation for runtime libraries somewhere.
315
316 @menu
317 * Texinfo Manuals::      GCC manuals in Texinfo format.
318 * Man Page Generation::  Generating man pages from Texinfo manuals.
319 * Miscellaneous Docs::   Miscellaneous text files with documentation.
320 @end menu
321
322 @node Texinfo Manuals
323 @subsubsection Texinfo Manuals
324
325 The manuals for GCC as a whole, and the C and C++ front ends, are in
326 files @file{doc/*.texi}.  Other front ends have their own manuals in
327 files @file{@var{language}/*.texi}.  Common files
328 @file{doc/include/*.texi} are provided which may be included in
329 multiple manuals; the following files are in @file{doc/include}:
330
331 @table @file
332 @item fdl.texi
333 The GNU Free Documentation License.
334 @item funding.texi
335 The section ``Funding Free Software''.
336 @item gcc-common.texi
337 Common definitions for manuals.
338 @item gpl.texi
339 The GNU General Public License.
340 @item texinfo.tex
341 A copy of @file{texinfo.tex} known to work with the GCC manuals.
342 @end table
343
344 DVI formatted manuals are generated by @samp{make dvi}, which uses
345 @command{texi2dvi} (via the Makefile macro @code{$(TEXI2DVI)}).  HTML
346 formatted manuals are generated by @command{make html}.  Info
347 manuals are generated by @samp{make info} (which is run as part of
348 a bootstrap); this generates the manuals in the source directory,
349 using @command{makeinfo} via the Makefile macro @code{$(MAKEINFO)},
350 and they are included in release distributions.
351
352 Manuals are also provided on the GCC web site, in both HTML and
353 PostScript forms.  This is done via the script
354 @file{maintainer-scripts/update_web_docs}.  Each manual to be
355 provided online must be listed in the definition of @code{MANUALS} in
356 that file; a file @file{@var{name}.texi} must only appear once in the
357 source tree, and the output manual must have the same name as the
358 source file.  (However, other Texinfo files, included in manuals but
359 not themselves the root files of manuals, may have names that appear
360 more than once in the source tree.)  The manual file
361 @file{@var{name}.texi} should only include other files in its own
362 directory or in @file{doc/include}.  HTML manuals will be generated by
363 @samp{makeinfo --html} and PostScript manuals by @command{texi2dvi}
364 and @command{dvips}.  All Texinfo files that are parts of manuals must
365 be checked into CVS, even if they are generated files, for the
366 generation of online manuals to work.
367
368 The installation manual, @file{doc/install.texi}, is also provided on
369 the GCC web site.  The HTML version is generated by the script
370 @file{doc/install.texi2html}.
371
372 @node Man Page Generation
373 @subsubsection Man Page Generation
374
375 Because of user demand, in addition to full Texinfo manuals, man pages
376 are provided which contain extracts from those manuals.  These man
377 pages are generated from the Texinfo manuals using
378 @file{contrib/texi2pod.pl} and @command{pod2man}.  (The man page for
379 @command{g++}, @file{cp/g++.1}, just contains a @samp{.so} reference
380 to @file{gcc.1}, but all the other man pages are generated from
381 Texinfo manuals.)
382
383 Because many systems may not have the necessary tools installed to
384 generate the man pages, they are only generated if the
385 @file{configure} script detects that recent enough tools are
386 installed, and the Makefiles allow generating man pages to fail
387 without aborting the build.  Man pages are also included in release
388 distributions.  They are generated in the source directory.
389
390 Magic comments in Texinfo files starting @samp{@@c man} control what
391 parts of a Texinfo file go into a man page.  Only a subset of Texinfo
392 is supported by @file{texi2pod.pl}, and it may be necessary to add
393 support for more Texinfo features to this script when generating new
394 man pages.  To improve the man page output, some special Texinfo
395 macros are provided in @file{doc/include/gcc-common.texi} which
396 @file{texi2pod.pl} understands:
397
398 @table @code
399 @item @@gcctabopt
400 Use in the form @samp{@@table @@gcctabopt} for tables of options,
401 where for printed output the effect of @samp{@@code} is better than
402 that of @samp{@@option} but for man page output a different effect is
403 wanted.
404 @item @@gccoptlist
405 Use for summary lists of options in manuals.
406 @item @@gol
407 Use at the end of each line inside @samp{@@gccoptlist}.  This is
408 necessary to avoid problems with differences in how the
409 @samp{@@gccoptlist} macro is handled by different Texinfo formatters.
410 @end table
411
412 FIXME: describe the @file{texi2pod.pl} input language and magic
413 comments in more detail.
414
415 @node Miscellaneous Docs
416 @subsubsection Miscellaneous Documentation
417
418 In addition to the formal documentation that is installed by GCC,
419 there are several other text files with miscellaneous documentation:
420
421 @table @file
422 @item ABOUT-GCC-NLS
423 Notes on GCC's Native Language Support.  FIXME: this should be part of
424 this manual rather than a separate file.
425 @item ABOUT-NLS
426 Notes on the Free Translation Project.
427 @item COPYING
428 The GNU General Public License.
429 @item COPYING.LIB
430 The GNU Lesser General Public License.
431 @item *ChangeLog*
432 @itemx */ChangeLog*
433 Change log files for various parts of GCC@.
434 @item LANGUAGES
435 Details of a few changes to the GCC front-end interface.  FIXME: the
436 information in this file should be part of general documentation of
437 the front-end interface in this manual.
438 @item ONEWS
439 Information about new features in old versions of GCC@.  (For recent
440 versions, the information is on the GCC web site.)
441 @item README.Portability
442 Information about portability issues when writing code in GCC@.  FIXME:
443 why isn't this part of this manual or of the GCC Coding Conventions?
444 @item SERVICE
445 A pointer to the GNU Service Directory.
446 @end table
447
448 FIXME: document such files in subdirectories, at least @file{config},
449 @file{cp}, @file{objc}, @file{testsuite}.
450
451 @node Front End
452 @subsection Anatomy of a Language Front End
453
454 A front end for a language in GCC has the following parts:
455
456 @itemize @bullet
457 @item
458 A directory @file{@var{language}} under @file{gcc} containing source
459 files for that front end.  @xref{Front End Directory, , The Front End
460 @file{@var{language}} Directory}, for details.
461 @item
462 A mention of the language in the list of supported languages in
463 @file{gcc/doc/install.texi}.
464 @item
465 A mention of the name under which the language's runtime library is
466 recognized by @option{--enable-shared=@var{package}} in the
467 documentation of that option in @file{gcc/doc/install.texi}.
468 @item
469 A mention of any special prerequisites for building the front end in
470 the documentation of prerequisites in @file{gcc/doc/install.texi}.
471 @item
472 Details of contributors to that front end in
473 @file{gcc/doc/contrib.texi}.  If the details are in that front end's
474 own manual then there should be a link to that manual's list in
475 @file{contrib.texi}.
476 @item
477 Information about support for that language in
478 @file{gcc/doc/frontends.texi}.
479 @item
480 Information about standards for that language, and the front end's
481 support for them, in @file{gcc/doc/standards.texi}.  This may be a
482 link to such information in the front end's own manual.
483 @item
484 Details of source file suffixes for that language and @option{-x
485 @var{lang}} options supported, in @file{gcc/doc/invoke.texi}.
486 @item
487 Entries in @code{default_compilers} in @file{gcc.c} for source file
488 suffixes for that language.
489 @item
490 Preferably testsuites, which may be under @file{gcc/testsuite} or
491 runtime library directories.  FIXME: document somewhere how to write
492 testsuite harnesses.
493 @item
494 Probably a runtime library for the language, outside the @file{gcc}
495 directory.  FIXME: document this further.
496 @item
497 Details of the directories of any runtime libraries in
498 @file{gcc/doc/sourcebuild.texi}.
499 @end itemize
500
501 If the front end is added to the official GCC CVS repository, the
502 following are also necessary:
503
504 @itemize @bullet
505 @item
506 At least one Bugzilla component for bugs in that front end and runtime
507 libraries.  This category needs to be mentioned in
508 @file{gcc/gccbug.in}, as well as being added to the Bugzilla database.
509 @item
510 Normally, one or more maintainers of that front end listed in
511 @file{MAINTAINERS}.
512 @item
513 Mentions on the GCC web site in @file{index.html} and
514 @file{frontends.html}, with any relevant links on
515 @file{readings.html}.  (Front ends that are not an official part of
516 GCC may also be listed on @file{frontends.html}, with relevant links.)
517 @item
518 A news item on @file{index.html}, and possibly an announcement on the
519 @email{gcc-announce@@gcc.gnu.org} mailing list.
520 @item
521 The front end's manuals should be mentioned in
522 @file{maintainer-scripts/update_web_docs} (@pxref{Texinfo Manuals})
523 and the online manuals should be linked to from
524 @file{onlinedocs/index.html}.
525 @item
526 Any old releases or CVS repositories of the front end, before its
527 inclusion in GCC, should be made available on the GCC FTP site
528 @uref{ftp://gcc.gnu.org/pub/gcc/old-releases/}.
529 @item
530 The release and snapshot script @file{maintainer-scripts/gcc_release}
531 should be updated to generate appropriate tarballs for this front end.
532 The associated @file{maintainer-scripts/snapshot-README} and
533 @file{maintainer-scripts/snapshot-index.html} files should be updated
534 to list the tarballs and diffs for this front end.
535 @item
536 If this front end includes its own version files that include the
537 current date, @file{maintainer-scripts/update_version} should be
538 updated accordingly.
539 @item
540 @file{CVSROOT/modules} in the GCC CVS repository should be updated.
541 @end itemize
542
543 @menu
544 * Front End Directory::  The front end @file{@var{language}} directory.
545 * Front End Config::     The front end @file{config-lang.in} file.
546 @end menu
547
548 @node Front End Directory
549 @subsubsection The Front End @file{@var{language}} Directory
550
551 A front end @file{@var{language}} directory contains the source files
552 of that front end (but not of any runtime libraries, which should be
553 outside the @file{gcc} directory).  This includes documentation, and
554 possibly some subsidiary programs build alongside the front end.
555 Certain files are special and other parts of the compiler depend on
556 their names:
557
558 @table @file
559 @item config-lang.in
560 This file is required in all language subdirectories.  @xref{Front End
561 Config, , The Front End @file{config-lang.in} File}, for details of
562 its contents
563 @item Make-lang.in
564 This file is required in all language subdirectories.  It contains
565 targets @code{@var{lang}.@var{hook}} (where @code{@var{lang}} is the
566 setting of @code{language} in @file{config-lang.in}) for the following
567 values of @code{@var{hook}}, and any other Makefile rules required to
568 build those targets (which may if necessary use other Makefiles
569 specified in @code{outputs} in @file{config-lang.in}, although this is
570 deprecated).  Some hooks are defined by using a double-colon rule for
571 @code{@var{hook}}, rather than by using a target of form
572 @code{@var{lang}.@var{hook}}.  These hooks are called ``double-colon
573 hooks'' below.  It also adds any testsuite targets that can use the
574 standard rule in @file{gcc/Makefile.in} to the variable
575 @code{lang_checks}.
576
577 @table @code
578 @item all.build
579 @itemx all.cross
580 @itemx start.encap
581 @itemx rest.encap
582 FIXME: exactly what goes in each of these targets?
583 @item tags
584 Build an @command{etags} @file{TAGS} file in the language subdirectory
585 in the source tree.
586 @item info
587 Build info documentation for the front end, in the build directory.
588 This target is only called by @samp{make bootstrap} if a suitable
589 version of @command{makeinfo} is available, so does not need to check
590 for this, and should fail if an error occurs.
591 @item dvi
592 Build DVI documentation for the front end, in the build directory.
593 This should be done using @code{$(TEXI2DVI)}, with appropriate
594 @option{-I} arguments pointing to directories of included files.
595 This hook is a double-colon hook.
596 @item html
597 Build HTML documentation for the front end, in the build directory.
598 @item man
599 Build generated man pages for the front end from Texinfo manuals
600 (@pxref{Man Page Generation}), in the build directory.  This target
601 is only called if the necessary tools are available, but should ignore
602 errors so as not to stop the build if errors occur; man pages are
603 optional and the tools involved may be installed in a broken way.
604 @item install-normal
605 FIXME: what is this target for?
606 @item install-common
607 Install everything that is part of the front end, apart from the
608 compiler executables listed in @code{compilers} in
609 @file{config-lang.in}.
610 @item install-info
611 Install info documentation for the front end, if it is present in the
612 source directory.  This target should have dependencies on info files
613 that should be installed.  This hook is a double-colon hook.
614 @item install-man
615 Install man pages for the front end.  This target should ignore
616 errors.
617 @item srcextra
618 Copies its dependencies into the source directory.  This generally should
619 be used for generated files such as Bison output files which are not
620 present in CVS, but should be included in any release tarballs.  This
621 target will be executed during a bootstrap if
622 @samp{--enable-generated-files-in-srcdir} was specified as a
623 @file{configure} option.
624 @item srcinfo
625 @itemx srcman
626 Copies its dependencies into the source directory.  These targets will be
627 executed during a bootstrap if @samp{--enable-generated-files-in-srcdir}
628 was specified as a @file{configure} option.
629 @item uninstall
630 Uninstall files installed by installing the compiler.  This is
631 currently documented not to be supported, so the hook need not do
632 anything.
633 @item mostlyclean
634 @itemx clean
635 @itemx distclean
636 @itemx maintainer-clean
637 The language parts of the standard GNU
638 @samp{*clean} targets.  @xref{Standard Targets, , Standard Targets for
639 Users, standards, GNU Coding Standards}, for details of the standard
640 targets.  For GCC, @code{maintainer-clean} should delete
641 all generated files in the source directory that are not checked into
642 CVS, but should not delete anything checked into CVS@.
643 @item stage1
644 @itemx stage2
645 @itemx stage3
646 @itemx stage4
647 @itemx stageprofile
648 @itemx stagefeedback
649 Move to the stage directory files not included in @code{stagestuff} in
650 @file{config-lang.in} or otherwise moved by the main @file{Makefile}.
651 @end table
652
653 @item lang.opt
654 This file registers the set of switches that the front end accepts on
655 the command line, and their @option{--help} text.  The file format is
656 documented in the file @file{c.opt}.  These files are processed by the
657 script @file{opts.sh}.
658 @item lang-specs.h
659 This file provides entries for @code{default_compilers} in
660 @file{gcc.c} which override the default of giving an error that a
661 compiler for that language is not installed.
662 @item @var{language}-tree.def
663 This file, which need not exist, defines any language-specific tree
664 codes.
665 @end table
666
667 @node Front End Config
668 @subsubsection The Front End @file{config-lang.in} File
669
670 Each language subdirectory contains a @file{config-lang.in} file.  In
671 addition the main directory contains @file{c-config-lang.in}, which
672 contains limited information for the C language.  This file is a shell
673 script that may define some variables describing the language:
674
675 @table @code
676 @item language
677 This definition must be present, and gives the name of the language
678 for some purposes such as arguments to @option{--enable-languages}.
679 @item lang_requires
680 If defined, this variable lists (space-separated) language front ends
681 other than C that this front end requires to be enabled (with the
682 names given being their @code{language} settings).  For example, the
683 Java front end depends on the C++ front end, so sets
684 @samp{lang_requires=c++}.
685 @item target_libs
686 If defined, this variable lists (space-separated) targets in the top
687 level @file{Makefile} to build the runtime libraries for this
688 language, such as @code{target-libobjc}.
689 @item lang_dirs
690 If defined, this variable lists (space-separated) top level
691 directories (parallel to @file{gcc}), apart from the runtime libraries,
692 that should not be configured if this front end is not built.
693 @item build_by_default
694 If defined to @samp{no}, this language front end is not built unless
695 enabled in a @option{--enable-languages} argument.  Otherwise, front
696 ends are built by default, subject to any special logic in
697 @file{configure.ac} (as is present to disable the Ada front end if the
698 Ada compiler is not already installed).
699 @item boot_language
700 If defined to @samp{yes}, this front end is built in stage 1 of the
701 bootstrap.  This is only relevant to front ends written in their own
702 languages.
703 @item compilers
704 If defined, a space-separated list of compiler executables that will
705 be run by the driver.  The names here will each end
706 with @samp{\$(exeext)}.
707 @item stagestuff
708 If defined, a space-separated list of files that should be moved to
709 the @file{stage@var{n}} directories in each stage of bootstrap.
710 @item outputs
711 If defined, a space-separated list of files that should be generated
712 by @file{configure} substituting values in them.  This mechanism can
713 be used to create a file @file{@var{language}/Makefile} from
714 @file{@var{language}/Makefile.in}, but this is deprecated, building
715 everything from the single @file{gcc/Makefile} is preferred.
716 @item gtfiles
717 If defined, a space-separated list of files that should be scanned by
718 gengtype.c to generate the garbage collection tables and routines for
719 this language.  This excludes the files that are common to all front
720 ends.  @xref{Type Information}.
721 @item need_gmp
722 If defined  to @samp{yes}, this frontend requires the GMP library.
723 Enables configure tests for GMP, which set @code{GMPLIBS} and
724 @code{GMPINC} appropriately.
725
726 @end table
727
728 @node Back End
729 @subsection Anatomy of a Target Back End
730
731 A back end for a target architecture in GCC has the following parts:
732
733 @itemize @bullet
734 @item
735 A directory @file{@var{machine}} under @file{gcc/config}, containing a
736 machine description @file{@var{machine}.md} file (@pxref{Machine Desc,
737 , Machine Descriptions}), header files @file{@var{machine}.h} and
738 @file{@var{machine}-protos.h} and a source file @file{@var{machine}.c}
739 (@pxref{Target Macros, , Target Description Macros and Functions}),
740 possibly a target Makefile fragment @file{t-@var{machine}}
741 (@pxref{Target Fragment, , The Target Makefile Fragment}), and maybe
742 some other files.  The names of these files may be changed from the
743 defaults given by explicit specifications in @file{config.gcc}.
744 @item
745 If necessary, a file @file{@var{machine}-modes.def} in the
746 @file{@var{machine}} directory, containing additional machine modes to
747 represent condition codes.  @xref{Condition Code}, for further details.
748 @item
749 Entries in @file{config.gcc} (@pxref{System Config, , The
750 @file{config.gcc} File}) for the systems with this target
751 architecture.
752 @item
753 Documentation in @file{gcc/doc/invoke.texi} for any command-line
754 options supported by this target (@pxref{Run-time Target, , Run-time
755 Target Specification}).  This means both entries in the summary table
756 of options and details of the individual options.
757 @item
758 Documentation in @file{gcc/doc/extend.texi} for any target-specific
759 attributes supported (@pxref{Target Attributes, , Defining
760 target-specific uses of @code{__attribute__}}), including where the
761 same attribute is already supported on some targets, which are
762 enumerated in the manual.
763 @item
764 Documentation in @file{gcc/doc/extend.texi} for any target-specific
765 pragmas supported.
766 @item
767 Documentation in @file{gcc/doc/extend.texi} of any target-specific
768 built-in functions supported.
769 @item
770 Documentation in @file{gcc/doc/extend.texi} of any target-specific
771 format checking styles supported.
772 @item
773 Documentation in @file{gcc/doc/md.texi} of any target-specific
774 constraint letters (@pxref{Machine Constraints, , Constraints for
775 Particular Machines}).
776 @item
777 A note in @file{gcc/doc/contrib.texi} under the person or people who
778 contributed the target support.
779 @item
780 Entries in @file{gcc/doc/install.texi} for all target triplets
781 supported with this target architecture, giving details of any special
782 notes about installation for this target, or saying that there are no
783 special notes if there are none.
784 @item
785 Possibly other support outside the @file{gcc} directory for runtime
786 libraries.  FIXME: reference docs for this.  The libstdc++ porting
787 manual needs to be installed as info for this to work, or to be a
788 chapter of this manual.
789 @end itemize
790
791 If the back end is added to the official GCC CVS repository, the
792 following are also necessary:
793
794 @itemize @bullet
795 @item
796 An entry for the target architecture in @file{readings.html} on the
797 GCC web site, with any relevant links.
798 @item
799 Details of the properties of the back end and target architecture in
800 @file{backends.html} on the GCC web site.
801 @item
802 A news item about the contribution of support for that target
803 architecture, in @file{index.html} on the GCC web site.
804 @item
805 Normally, one or more maintainers of that target listed in
806 @file{MAINTAINERS}.  Some existing architectures may be unmaintained,
807 but it would be unusual to add support for a target that does not have
808 a maintainer when support is added.
809 @end itemize
810
811 @node Testsuites
812 @section Testsuites
813
814 GCC contains several testsuites to help maintain compiler quality.
815 Most of the runtime libraries and language front ends in GCC have
816 testsuites.  Currently only the C language testsuites are documented
817 here; FIXME: document the others.
818
819 @menu
820 * Test Idioms::     Idioms used in testsuite code.
821 * Test Directives:: Directives used within DejaGnu tests.
822 * Ada Tests::       The Ada language testsuites.
823 * C Tests::         The C language testsuites.
824 * libgcj Tests::    The Java library testsuites.
825 * gcov Testing::    Support for testing gcov.
826 * profopt Testing:: Support for testing profile-directed optimizations.
827 * compat Testing::  Support for testing binary compatibility.
828 @end menu
829
830 @node Test Idioms
831 @subsection Idioms Used in Testsuite Code
832
833 In general C testcases have a trailing @file{-@var{n}.c}, starting
834 with @file{-1.c}, in case other testcases with similar names are added
835 later.  If the test is a test of some well-defined feature, it should
836 have a name referring to that feature such as
837 @file{@var{feature}-1.c}.  If it does not test a well-defined feature
838 but just happens to exercise a bug somewhere in the compiler, and a
839 bug report has been filed for this bug in the GCC bug database,
840 @file{pr@var{bug-number}-1.c} is the appropriate form of name.
841 Otherwise (for miscellaneous bugs not filed in the GCC bug database),
842 and previously more generally, test cases are named after the date on
843 which they were added.  This allows people to tell at a glance whether
844 a test failure is because of a recently found bug that has not yet
845 been fixed, or whether it may be a regression, but does not give any
846 other information about the bug or where discussion of it may be
847 found.  Some other language testsuites follow similar conventions.
848
849 In the @file{gcc.dg} testsuite, it is often necessary to test that an
850 error is indeed a hard error and not just a warning---for example,
851 where it is a constraint violation in the C standard, which must
852 become an error with @option{-pedantic-errors}.  The following idiom,
853 where the first line shown is line @var{line} of the file and the line
854 that generates the error, is used for this:
855
856 @smallexample
857 /* @{ dg-bogus "warning" "warning in place of error" @} */
858 /* @{ dg-error "@var{regexp}" "@var{message}" @{ target *-*-* @} @var{line} @} */
859 @end smallexample
860
861 It may be necessary to check that an expression is an integer constant
862 expression and has a certain value.  To check that @code{@var{E}} has
863 value @code{@var{V}}, an idiom similar to the following is used:
864
865 @smallexample
866 char x[((E) == (V) ? 1 : -1)];
867 @end smallexample
868
869 In @file{gcc.dg} tests, @code{__typeof__} is sometimes used to make
870 assertions about the types of expressions.  See, for example,
871 @file{gcc.dg/c99-condexpr-1.c}.  The more subtle uses depend on the
872 exact rules for the types of conditional expressions in the C
873 standard; see, for example, @file{gcc.dg/c99-intconst-1.c}.
874
875 It is useful to be able to test that optimizations are being made
876 properly.  This cannot be done in all cases, but it can be done where
877 the optimization will lead to code being optimized away (for example,
878 where flow analysis or alias analysis should show that certain code
879 cannot be called) or to functions not being called because they have
880 been expanded as built-in functions.  Such tests go in
881 @file{gcc.c-torture/execute}.  Where code should be optimized away, a
882 call to a nonexistent function such as @code{link_failure ()} may be
883 inserted; a definition
884
885 @smallexample
886 #ifndef __OPTIMIZE__
887 void
888 link_failure (void)
889 @{
890   abort ();
891 @}
892 #endif
893 @end smallexample
894
895 @noindent
896 will also be needed so that linking still succeeds when the test is
897 run without optimization.  When all calls to a built-in function
898 should have been optimized and no calls to the non-built-in version of
899 the function should remain, that function may be defined as
900 @code{static} to call @code{abort ()} (although redeclaring a function
901 as static may not work on all targets).
902
903 All testcases must be portable.  Target-specific testcases must have
904 appropriate code to avoid causing failures on unsupported systems;
905 unfortunately, the mechanisms for this differ by directory.
906
907 FIXME: discuss non-C testsuites here.
908
909 @node Test Directives
910 @subsection Directives used within DejaGnu tests
911
912 Test directives appear within comments in a test source file and begin
913 with @code{dg-}.  Some of these are defined within DegaGnu and others
914 are local to the GCC testsuite.
915
916 The order in which test directives appear in a test can be important:
917 directives local to GCC sometimes override information used by the
918 DejaGnu directives, which know nothing about the GCC directives, so the
919 DejaGnu directives must precede GCC directives.
920
921 Several test directives include selectors which are usually preceded by
922 the keyword @code{target} or @code{xfail}.  A selector is: one or more
923 target triplets, possibly including wildcard characters; a single
924 effective-target keyword; or a logical expression.  Depending on the
925 context, the selector specifies whether a test is skipped and reported
926 as unsupported or is expected to fail.  Use @samp{*-*-*} to match any
927 target.
928 Effective-target keywords are defined in @file{target-supports.exp} in
929 the GCC testsuite.
930
931 A selector expression appears within curly braces and uses a single
932 logical operator: one of @samp{!}, @samp{&&}, or @samp{||}.  An
933 operand is another selector expression, an effective-target keyword,
934 a single target triplet, or a list of target triplets within quotes or
935 curly braces.  For example:
936
937 @smallexample
938 @{ target @{ ! "hppa*-*-* ia64*-*-*" @} @}
939 @{ target @{ powerpc*-*-* && lp64 @} @}
940 @{ xfail @{ lp64 || vect_no_align @} @}
941 @end smallexample
942
943 @table @code
944 @item @{ dg-do @var{do-what-keyword} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}] @}
945 @var{do-what-keyword} specifies how the test is compiled and whether
946 it is executed.  It is one of:
947
948 @table @code
949 @item preprocess
950 Compile with @option{-E} to run only the preprocessor.
951 @item assemble
952 Compile with @option{-S} to produce an assembly code file.
953 @item compile
954 Compile with @option{-c} to produce a relocatable object file.
955 @item link
956 Compile, assemble, and link to produce an executable file.
957 @item run
958 Produce and run an executable file, which is expected to return
959 an exit code of 0.
960 @end table
961
962 The default is @code{compile}.  That can be overridden for a set of
963 tests by redefining @code{dg-do-what-default} within the @code{.exp}
964 file for those tests.
965
966 If the directive includes the optional @samp{@{ target @var{selector} @}}
967 then the test is skipped unless the target system is included in the
968 list of target triplets or matches the effective-target keyword.
969
970 If the directive includes the optional @samp{@{ xfail @var{selector} @}}
971 and the selector is met then the test is expected to fail.  For
972 @code{dg-do run}, execution is expected to fail but compilation
973 is expected to pass.
974
975 @item @{ dg-options @var{options} [@{ target @var{selector} @}] @}
976 This DejaGnu directive provides a list of compiler options, to be used
977 if the target system matches @var{selector}, that replace the default
978 options used for this set of tests.
979
980 @item @{ dg-skip-if @var{comment} @{ @var{selector} @} @{ @var{include-opts} @} @{ @var{exclude-opts} @} @}
981 Skip the test if the test system is included in @var{selector} and if
982 each of the options in @var{include-opts} is in the set of options with
983 which the test would be compiled and if none of the options in
984 @var{exclude-opts} is in the set of options with which the test would be
985 compiled.
986
987 Use @samp{"*"} for an empty @var{include-opts} list and @samp{""} for
988 an empty @var{exclude-opts} list.
989
990 @item  @{ dg-xfail-if @var{comment} @{ @var{selector} @} @{ @var{include-opts} @} @{ @var{exclude-opts} @} @}
991 Expect the test to fail if the conditions (which are the same as for
992 @code{dg-skip-if}) are met.
993
994 @item @{ dg-require-@var{support} args @}
995 Skip the test if the target does not provide the required support;
996 see @file{gcc-dg.exp} in the GCC testsuite for the actual directives.
997 These directives must appear after any @code{dg-do} directive in the test.
998 They require at least one argument, which can be an empty string if the
999 specific procedure does not examine the argument.
1000
1001 @item @{ dg-require-effective-target @var{keyword} @}
1002 Skip the test if the test target, including current multilib flags,
1003 is not covered by the effective-target keyword.
1004 This directive must appear after any @code{dg-do} directive in the test.
1005
1006 @item @{ dg-error @var{regexp} [@var{comment} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @} [@var{line}] @}]] @}
1007 This DejaGnu directive appears on a source line that is expected to get
1008 an error message, or else specifies the source line associated with the
1009 message.  If there is no message for that line or if the text of that
1010 message is not matched by @var{regexp} then the check fails and
1011 @var{comment} is included in the @code{FAIL} message.  The check does
1012 not look for the string @samp{"error"} unless it is part of @var{regexp}.
1013
1014 @item @{ dg-warning @var{regexp} [@var{comment} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @} [@var{line}] @}]] @}
1015 This DejaGnu directive appears on a source line that is expected to get
1016 a warning message, or else specifies the source line associated with the
1017 message.  If there is no message for that line or if the text of that
1018 message is not matched by @var{regexp} then the check fails and
1019 @var{comment} is included in the @code{FAIL} message.  The check does
1020 not look for the string @samp{"warning"} unless it is part of @var{regexp}.
1021
1022 @item @{ dg-bogus @var{regexp} [@var{comment} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @} [@var{line}] @}]] @}
1023 This DejaGnu directive appears on a source line that should not get a
1024 message matching @var{regexp}, or else specifies the source line
1025 associated with the bogus message.  It is usually used with @samp{xfail}
1026 to indicate that the message is a known problem for a particular set of
1027 targets.
1028
1029 @item @{ dg-excess-errors @var{comment} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}] @}
1030 This DejaGnu directive indicates that the test is expected to fail due
1031 to compiler messages that are not handled by @samp{dg-error},
1032 @samp{dg-warning} or @samp{dg-bogus}.
1033
1034 @item @{ dg-output @var{regexp} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}] @}
1035 This DejaGnu directive compares @var{regexp} to the combined output
1036 that the test executable writes to @file{stdout} and @file{stderr}.
1037
1038 @item @{ dg-prune-output @var{regexp} @}
1039 Prune messages matching @var{regexp} from test output.
1040
1041 @item @{ dg-additional-files "@var{filelist}" @}
1042 Specify additional files, other than source files, that must be copied
1043 to the system where the compiler runs.
1044
1045 @item @{ dg-additional-sources "@var{filelist}" @}
1046 Specify additional source files to appear in the compile line
1047 following the main test file.
1048
1049 @item @{ dg-final @{ @var{local-directive} @} @}
1050 This DejaGnu directive is placed within a comment anywhere in the
1051 source file and is processed after the test has been compiled and run.
1052 Multiple @samp{dg-final} commands are processed in the order in which
1053 they appear in the source file.
1054
1055 The GCC testsuite defines the following directives to be used within
1056 @code{dg-final}.
1057
1058 @table @code
1059 @item scan-file @var{filename} @var{regexp} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}]
1060 Passes if @var{regexp} matches text in @var{filename}.
1061
1062 @item scan-file-not @var{filename} @var{regexp} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}]
1063 Passes if @var{regexp} does not match text in @var{filename}.
1064
1065 @item scan-hidden @var{symbol} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}]
1066 Passes if @var{symbol} is defined as a hidden symbol in the test's
1067 assembly output.
1068
1069 @item scan-not-hidden @var{symbol} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}]
1070 Passes if @var{symbol} is not defined as a hidden symbol in the test's
1071 assembly output.
1072
1073 @item scan-assembler-times @var{regex} @var{num} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}]
1074 Passes if @var{regex} is matched exactly @var{num} times in the test's
1075 assembler output.
1076
1077 @item scan-assembler @var{regex} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}]
1078 Passes if @var{regex} matches text in the test's assembler output.
1079
1080 @item scan-assembler-not @var{regex} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}]
1081 Passes if @var{regex} does not match text in the test's assembler output.
1082
1083 @item scan-assembler-dem @var{regex} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}]
1084 Passes if @var{regex} matches text in the test's demangled assembler output.
1085
1086 @item scan-assembler-dem-not @var{regex} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}]
1087 Passes if @var{regex} does not match text in the test's demangled assembler
1088 output.
1089
1090 @item scan-tree-dump-times @var{regex} @var{num} @var{suffix} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}]
1091 Passes if @var{regex} is found exactly @var{num} times in the dump file
1092 with suffix @var{suffix}.
1093
1094 @item scan-tree-dump @var{regex} @var{suffix} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}]
1095 Passes if @var{regex} matches text in the dump file with suffix @var{suffix}.
1096
1097 @item scan-tree-dump-not @var{regex} @var{suffix} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}]
1098 Passes if @var{regex} does not match text in the dump file with suffix
1099 @var{suffix}.
1100
1101 @item scan-tree-dump-dem @var{regex} @var{suffix} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}]
1102 Passes if @var{regex} matches demangled text in the dump file with
1103 suffix @var{suffix}.
1104
1105 @item scan-tree-dump-dem-not @var{regex} @var{suffix} [@{ target/xfail @var{selector} @}]
1106 Passes if @var{regex} does not match demangled text in the dump file with
1107 suffix @var{suffix}.
1108
1109 @item run-gcov @var{sourcefile}
1110 Check line counts in @command{gcov} tests.
1111
1112 @item run-gcov [branches] [calls] @{ @var{opts} @var{sourcefile} @}
1113 Check branch and/or call counts, in addition to line counts, in
1114 @command{gcov} tests.
1115 @end table
1116 @end table
1117
1118 @node Ada Tests
1119 @subsection Ada Language Testsuites
1120
1121 The Ada testsuite includes executable tests from the ACATS 2.5
1122 testsuite, publicly available at
1123 @uref{http://www.adaic.org/compilers/acats/2.5}
1124
1125 These tests are integrated in the GCC testsuite in the
1126 @file{gcc/testsuite/ada/acats} directory, and
1127 enabled automatically when running @code{make check}, assuming
1128 the Ada language has been enabled when configuring GCC@.
1129
1130 You can also run the Ada testsuite independently, using
1131 @code{make check-ada}, or run a subset of the tests by specifying which
1132 chapter to run, e.g.:
1133
1134 @smallexample
1135 $ make check-ada CHAPTERS="c3 c9"
1136 @end smallexample
1137
1138 The tests are organized by directory, each directory corresponding to
1139 a chapter of the Ada Reference Manual.  So for example, c9 corresponds
1140 to chapter 9, which deals with tasking features of the language.
1141
1142 There is also an extra chapter called @file{gcc} containing a template for
1143 creating new executable tests.
1144
1145 The tests are run using two @command{sh} scripts: @file{run_acats} and
1146 @file{run_all.sh}.  To run the tests using a simulator or a cross
1147 target, see the small
1148 customization section at the top of @file{run_all.sh}.
1149
1150 These tests are run using the build tree: they can be run without doing
1151 a @code{make install}.
1152
1153 @node C Tests
1154 @subsection C Language Testsuites
1155
1156 GCC contains the following C language testsuites, in the
1157 @file{gcc/testsuite} directory:
1158
1159 @table @file
1160 @item gcc.dg
1161 This contains tests of particular features of the C compiler, using the
1162 more modern @samp{dg} harness.  Correctness tests for various compiler
1163 features should go here if possible.
1164
1165 Magic comments determine whether the file
1166 is preprocessed, compiled, linked or run.  In these tests, error and warning
1167 message texts are compared against expected texts or regular expressions
1168 given in comments.  These tests are run with the options @samp{-ansi -pedantic}
1169 unless other options are given in the test.  Except as noted below they
1170 are not run with multiple optimization options.
1171 @item gcc.dg/compat
1172 This subdirectory contains tests for binary compatibility using
1173 @file{compat.exp}, which in turn uses the language-independent support
1174 (@pxref{compat Testing, , Support for testing binary compatibility}).
1175 @item gcc.dg/cpp
1176 This subdirectory contains tests of the preprocessor.
1177 @item gcc.dg/debug
1178 This subdirectory contains tests for debug formats.  Tests in this
1179 subdirectory are run for each debug format that the compiler supports.
1180 @item gcc.dg/format
1181 This subdirectory contains tests of the @option{-Wformat} format
1182 checking.  Tests in this directory are run with and without
1183 @option{-DWIDE}.
1184 @item gcc.dg/noncompile
1185 This subdirectory contains tests of code that should not compile and
1186 does not need any special compilation options.  They are run with
1187 multiple optimization options, since sometimes invalid code crashes
1188 the compiler with optimization.
1189 @item gcc.dg/special
1190 FIXME: describe this.
1191
1192 @item gcc.c-torture
1193 This contains particular code fragments which have historically broken easily.
1194 These tests are run with multiple optimization options, so tests for features
1195 which only break at some optimization levels belong here.  This also contains
1196 tests to check that certain optimizations occur.  It might be worthwhile to
1197 separate the correctness tests cleanly from the code quality tests, but
1198 it hasn't been done yet.
1199
1200 @item gcc.c-torture/compat
1201 FIXME: describe this.
1202
1203 This directory should probably not be used for new tests.
1204 @item gcc.c-torture/compile
1205 This testsuite contains test cases that should compile, but do not
1206 need to link or run.  These test cases are compiled with several
1207 different combinations of optimization options.  All warnings are
1208 disabled for these test cases, so this directory is not suitable if
1209 you wish to test for the presence or absence of compiler warnings.
1210 While special options can be set, and tests disabled on specific
1211 platforms, by the use of @file{.x} files, mostly these test cases
1212 should not contain platform dependencies.  FIXME: discuss how defines
1213 such as @code{NO_LABEL_VALUES} and @code{STACK_SIZE} are used.
1214 @item gcc.c-torture/execute
1215 This testsuite contains test cases that should compile, link and run;
1216 otherwise the same comments as for @file{gcc.c-torture/compile} apply.
1217 @item gcc.c-torture/execute/ieee
1218 This contains tests which are specific to IEEE floating point.
1219 @item gcc.c-torture/unsorted
1220 FIXME: describe this.
1221
1222 This directory should probably not be used for new tests.
1223 @item gcc.c-torture/misc-tests
1224 This directory contains C tests that require special handling.  Some
1225 of these tests have individual expect files, and others share
1226 special-purpose expect files:
1227
1228 @table @file
1229 @item @code{bprob*.c}
1230 Test @option{-fbranch-probabilities} using @file{bprob.exp}, which
1231 in turn uses the generic, language-independent framework
1232 (@pxref{profopt Testing, , Support for testing profile-directed
1233 optimizations}).
1234
1235 @item @code{dg-*.c}
1236 Test the testsuite itself using @file{dg-test.exp}.
1237
1238 @item @code{gcov*.c}
1239 Test @command{gcov} output using @file{gcov.exp}, which in turn uses the
1240 language-independent support (@pxref{gcov Testing, , Support for testing gcov}).
1241
1242 @item @code{i386-pf-*.c}
1243 Test i386-specific support for data prefetch using @file{i386-prefetch.exp}.
1244 @end table
1245
1246 @end table
1247
1248 FIXME: merge in @file{testsuite/README.gcc} and discuss the format of
1249 test cases and magic comments more.
1250
1251 @node libgcj Tests
1252 @subsection The Java library testsuites.
1253
1254 Runtime tests are executed via @samp{make check} in the
1255 @file{@var{target}/libjava/testsuite} directory in the build
1256 tree.  Additional runtime tests can be checked into this testsuite.
1257
1258 Regression testing of the core packages in libgcj is also covered by the
1259 Mauve testsuite.  The @uref{http://sources.redhat.com/mauve/,,Mauve Project}
1260 develops tests for the Java Class Libraries.  These tests are run as part
1261 of libgcj testing by placing the Mauve tree within the libjava testsuite
1262 sources at @file{libjava/testsuite/libjava.mauve/mauve}, or by specifying
1263 the location of that tree when invoking @samp{make}, as in
1264 @samp{make MAUVEDIR=~/mauve check}.
1265
1266 To detect regressions, a mechanism in @file{mauve.exp} compares the
1267 failures for a test run against the list of expected failures in
1268 @file{libjava/testsuite/libjava.mauve/xfails} from the source hierarchy.
1269 Update this file when adding new failing tests to Mauve, or when fixing
1270 bugs in libgcj that had caused Mauve test failures.
1271
1272 The @uref{http://oss.software.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/jacks/,,
1273 Jacks} project provides a testsuite for Java compilers that can be used
1274 to test changes that affect the GCJ front end.  This testsuite is run as
1275 part of Java testing by placing the Jacks tree within the the libjava
1276 testsuite sources at @file{libjava/testsuite/libjava.jacks/jacks}.
1277
1278 We encourage developers to contribute test cases to Mauve and Jacks.
1279
1280 @node gcov Testing
1281 @subsection Support for testing @command{gcov}
1282
1283 Language-independent support for testing @command{gcov}, and for checking
1284 that branch profiling produces expected values, is provided by the
1285 expect file @file{gcov.exp}.  @command{gcov} tests also rely on procedures
1286 in @file{gcc.dg.exp} to compile and run the test program.  A typical
1287 @command{gcov} test contains the following DejaGnu commands within comments:
1288
1289 @smallexample
1290 @{ dg-options "-fprofile-arcs -ftest-coverage" @}
1291 @{ dg-do run @{ target native @} @}
1292 @{ dg-final @{ run-gcov sourcefile @} @}
1293 @end smallexample
1294
1295 Checks of @command{gcov} output can include line counts, branch percentages,
1296 and call return percentages.  All of these checks are requested via
1297 commands that appear in comments in the test's source file.
1298 Commands to check line counts are processed by default.
1299 Commands to check branch percentages and call return percentages are
1300 processed if the @command{run-gcov} command has arguments @code{branches}
1301 or @code{calls}, respectively.  For example, the following specifies
1302 checking both, as well as passing @option{-b} to @command{gcov}:
1303
1304 @smallexample
1305 @{ dg-final @{ run-gcov branches calls @{ -b sourcefile @} @} @}
1306 @end smallexample
1307
1308 A line count command appears within a comment on the source line
1309 that is expected to get the specified count and has the form
1310 @code{count(@var{cnt})}.  A test should only check line counts for
1311 lines that will get the same count for any architecture.
1312
1313 Commands to check branch percentages (@code{branch}) and call
1314 return percentages (@code{returns}) are very similar to each other.
1315 A beginning command appears on or before the first of a range of
1316 lines that will report the percentage, and the ending command
1317 follows that range of lines.  The beginning command can include a
1318 list of percentages, all of which are expected to be found within
1319 the range.  A range is terminated by the next command of the same
1320 kind.  A command @code{branch(end)} or @code{returns(end)} marks
1321 the end of a range without starting a new one.  For example:
1322
1323 @smallexample
1324 if (i > 10 && j > i && j < 20)  /* @r{branch(27 50 75)} */
1325                                 /* @r{branch(end)} */
1326   foo (i, j);
1327 @end smallexample
1328
1329 For a call return percentage, the value specified is the
1330 percentage of calls reported to return.  For a branch percentage,
1331 the value is either the expected percentage or 100 minus that
1332 value, since the direction of a branch can differ depending on the
1333 target or the optimization level.
1334
1335 Not all branches and calls need to be checked.  A test should not
1336 check for branches that might be optimized away or replaced with
1337 predicated instructions.  Don't check for calls inserted by the
1338 compiler or ones that might be inlined or optimized away.
1339
1340 A single test can check for combinations of line counts, branch
1341 percentages, and call return percentages.  The command to check a
1342 line count must appear on the line that will report that count, but
1343 commands to check branch percentages and call return percentages can
1344 bracket the lines that report them.
1345
1346 @node profopt Testing
1347 @subsection Support for testing profile-directed optimizations
1348
1349 The file @file{profopt.exp} provides language-independent support for
1350 checking correct execution of a test built with profile-directed
1351 optimization.  This testing requires that a test program be built and
1352 executed twice.  The first time it is compiled to generate profile
1353 data, and the second time it is compiled to use the data that was
1354 generated during the first execution.  The second execution is to
1355 verify that the test produces the expected results.
1356
1357 To check that the optimization actually generated better code, a
1358 test can be built and run a third time with normal optimizations to
1359 verify that the performance is better with the profile-directed
1360 optimizations.  @file{profopt.exp} has the beginnings of this kind
1361 of support.
1362
1363 @file{profopt.exp} provides generic support for profile-directed
1364 optimizations.  Each set of tests that uses it provides information
1365 about a specific optimization:
1366
1367 @table @code
1368 @item tool
1369 tool being tested, e.g., @command{gcc}
1370
1371 @item profile_option
1372 options used to generate profile data
1373
1374 @item feedback_option
1375 options used to optimize using that profile data
1376
1377 @item prof_ext
1378 suffix of profile data files
1379
1380 @item PROFOPT_OPTIONS
1381 list of options with which to run each test, similar to the lists for
1382 torture tests
1383 @end table
1384
1385 @node compat Testing
1386 @subsection Support for testing binary compatibility
1387
1388 The file @file{compat.exp} provides language-independent support for
1389 binary compatibility testing.  It supports testing interoperability of
1390 two compilers that follow the same ABI, or of multiple sets of
1391 compiler options that should not affect binary compatibility.  It is
1392 intended to be used for testsuites that complement ABI testsuites.
1393
1394 A test supported by this framework has three parts, each in a
1395 separate source file: a main program and two pieces that interact
1396 with each other to split up the functionality being tested.
1397
1398 @table @file
1399 @item @var{testname}_main.@var{suffix}
1400 Contains the main program, which calls a function in file
1401 @file{@var{testname}_x.@var{suffix}}.
1402
1403 @item @var{testname}_x.@var{suffix}
1404 Contains at least one call to a function in
1405 @file{@var{testname}_y.@var{suffix}}.
1406
1407 @item @var{testname}_y.@var{suffix}
1408 Shares data with, or gets arguments from,
1409 @file{@var{testname}_x.@var{suffix}}.
1410 @end table
1411
1412 Within each test, the main program and one functional piece are
1413 compiled by the GCC under test.  The other piece can be compiled by
1414 an alternate compiler.  If no alternate compiler is specified,
1415 then all three source files are all compiled by the GCC under test.
1416 You can specify pairs of sets of compiler options.  The first element
1417 of such a pair specifies options used with the GCC under test, and the
1418 second element of the pair specifies options used with the alternate
1419 compiler.  Each test is compiled with each pair of options.
1420
1421 @file{compat.exp} defines default pairs of compiler options.
1422 These can be overridden by defining the environment variable
1423 @env{COMPAT_OPTIONS} as:
1424
1425 @smallexample
1426 COMPAT_OPTIONS="[list [list @{@var{tst1}@} @{@var{alt1}@}]
1427   ...[list @{@var{tstn}@} @{@var{altn}@}]]"
1428 @end smallexample
1429
1430 where @var{tsti} and @var{alti} are lists of options, with @var{tsti}
1431 used by the compiler under test and @var{alti} used by the alternate
1432 compiler.  For example, with
1433 @code{[list [list @{-g -O0@} @{-O3@}] [list @{-fpic@} @{-fPIC -O2@}]]},
1434 the test is first built with @option{-g -O0} by the compiler under
1435 test and with @option{-O3} by the alternate compiler.  The test is
1436 built a second time using @option{-fpic} by the compiler under test
1437 and @option{-fPIC -O2} by the alternate compiler.
1438
1439 An alternate compiler is specified by defining an environment
1440 variable to be the full pathname of an installed compiler; for C
1441 define @env{ALT_CC_UNDER_TEST}, and for C++ define
1442 @env{ALT_CXX_UNDER_TEST}.  These will be written to the
1443 @file{site.exp} file used by DejaGnu.  The default is to build each
1444 test with the compiler under test using the first of each pair of
1445 compiler options from @env{COMPAT_OPTIONS}.  When
1446 @env{ALT_CC_UNDER_TEST} or
1447 @env{ALT_CXX_UNDER_TEST} is @code{same}, each test is built using
1448 the compiler under test but with combinations of the options from
1449 @env{COMPAT_OPTIONS}.
1450
1451 To run only the C++ compatibility suite using the compiler under test
1452 and another version of GCC using specific compiler options, do the
1453 following from @file{@var{objdir}/gcc}:
1454
1455 @smallexample
1456 rm site.exp
1457 make -k \
1458   ALT_CXX_UNDER_TEST=$@{alt_prefix@}/bin/g++ \
1459   COMPAT_OPTIONS="lists as shown above" \
1460   check-c++ \
1461   RUNTESTFLAGS="compat.exp"
1462 @end smallexample
1463
1464 A test that fails when the source files are compiled with different
1465 compilers, but passes when the files are compiled with the same
1466 compiler, demonstrates incompatibility of the generated code or
1467 runtime support.  A test that fails for the alternate compiler but
1468 passes for the compiler under test probably tests for a bug that was
1469 fixed in the compiler under test but is present in the alternate
1470 compiler.
1471
1472 The binary compatibility tests support a small number of test framework
1473 commands that appear within comments in a test file.
1474
1475 @table @code
1476 @item dg-require-*
1477 These commands can be used in @file{@var{testname}_main.@var{suffix}}
1478 to skip the test if specific support is not available on the target.
1479
1480 @item dg-options
1481 The specified options are used for compiling this particular source
1482 file, appended to the options from @env{COMPAT_OPTIONS}.  When this
1483 command appears in @file{@var{testname}_main.@var{suffix}} the options
1484 are also used to link the test program.
1485
1486 @item dg-xfail-if
1487 This command can be used in a secondary source file to specify that
1488 compilation is expected to fail for particular options on particular
1489 targets.
1490 @end table