OSDN Git Service

2006-10-04 Brooks Moses <bmoses@stanford.edu>
[pf3gnuchains/gcc-fork.git] / gcc / doc / gcov.texi
1 @c Copyright (C) 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001,
2 @c 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
3 @c This is part of the GCC manual.
4 @c For copying conditions, see the file gcc.texi.
5
6 @ignore
7 @c man begin COPYRIGHT
8 Copyright @copyright{} 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005
9 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
10
11 Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
12 under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or
13 any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with the
14 Invariant Sections being ``GNU General Public License'' and ``Funding
15 Free Software'', the Front-Cover texts being (a) (see below), and with
16 the Back-Cover Texts being (b) (see below).  A copy of the license is
17 included in the gfdl(7) man page.
18
19 (a) The FSF's Front-Cover Text is:
20
21      A GNU Manual
22
23 (b) The FSF's Back-Cover Text is:
24
25      You have freedom to copy and modify this GNU Manual, like GNU
26      software.  Copies published by the Free Software Foundation raise
27      funds for GNU development.
28 @c man end
29 @c Set file name and title for the man page.
30 @setfilename gcov
31 @settitle coverage testing tool
32 @end ignore
33
34 @node Gcov
35 @chapter @command{gcov}---a Test Coverage Program
36
37 @command{gcov} is a tool you can use in conjunction with GCC to
38 test code coverage in your programs.
39
40 @menu
41 * Gcov Intro::                  Introduction to gcov.
42 * Invoking Gcov::               How to use gcov.
43 * Gcov and Optimization::       Using gcov with GCC optimization.
44 * Gcov Data Files::             The files used by gcov.
45 * Cross-profiling::             Data file relocation.
46 @end menu
47
48 @node Gcov Intro
49 @section Introduction to @command{gcov}
50 @c man begin DESCRIPTION
51
52 @command{gcov} is a test coverage program.  Use it in concert with GCC
53 to analyze your programs to help create more efficient, faster running
54 code and to discover untested parts of your program.  You can use
55 @command{gcov} as a profiling tool to help discover where your
56 optimization efforts will best affect your code.  You can also use
57 @command{gcov} along with the other profiling tool, @command{gprof}, to
58 assess which parts of your code use the greatest amount of computing
59 time.
60
61 Profiling tools help you analyze your code's performance.  Using a
62 profiler such as @command{gcov} or @command{gprof}, you can find out some
63 basic performance statistics, such as:
64
65 @itemize @bullet
66 @item
67 how often each line of code executes
68
69 @item
70 what lines of code are actually executed
71
72 @item
73 how much computing time each section of code uses
74 @end itemize
75
76 Once you know these things about how your code works when compiled, you
77 can look at each module to see which modules should be optimized.
78 @command{gcov} helps you determine where to work on optimization.
79
80 Software developers also use coverage testing in concert with
81 testsuites, to make sure software is actually good enough for a release.
82 Testsuites can verify that a program works as expected; a coverage
83 program tests to see how much of the program is exercised by the
84 testsuite.  Developers can then determine what kinds of test cases need
85 to be added to the testsuites to create both better testing and a better
86 final product.
87
88 You should compile your code without optimization if you plan to use
89 @command{gcov} because the optimization, by combining some lines of code
90 into one function, may not give you as much information as you need to
91 look for `hot spots' where the code is using a great deal of computer
92 time.  Likewise, because @command{gcov} accumulates statistics by line (at
93 the lowest resolution), it works best with a programming style that
94 places only one statement on each line.  If you use complicated macros
95 that expand to loops or to other control structures, the statistics are
96 less helpful---they only report on the line where the macro call
97 appears.  If your complex macros behave like functions, you can replace
98 them with inline functions to solve this problem.
99
100 @command{gcov} creates a logfile called @file{@var{sourcefile}.gcov} which
101 indicates how many times each line of a source file @file{@var{sourcefile}.c}
102 has executed.  You can use these logfiles along with @command{gprof} to aid
103 in fine-tuning the performance of your programs.  @command{gprof} gives
104 timing information you can use along with the information you get from
105 @command{gcov}.
106
107 @command{gcov} works only on code compiled with GCC@.  It is not
108 compatible with any other profiling or test coverage mechanism.
109
110 @c man end
111
112 @node Invoking Gcov
113 @section Invoking @command{gcov}
114
115 @smallexample
116 gcov @r{[}@var{options}@r{]} @var{sourcefile}
117 @end smallexample
118
119 @command{gcov} accepts the following options:
120
121 @ignore
122 @c man begin SYNOPSIS
123 gcov [@option{-v}|@option{--version}] [@option{-h}|@option{--help}]
124      [@option{-a}|@option{--all-blocks}]
125      [@option{-b}|@option{--branch-probabilities}]
126      [@option{-c}|@option{--branch-counts}]
127      [@option{-n}|@option{--no-output}]
128      [@option{-l}|@option{--long-file-names}]
129      [@option{-p}|@option{--preserve-paths}]
130      [@option{-f}|@option{--function-summaries}]
131      [@option{-o}|@option{--object-directory} @var{directory|file}] @var{sourcefile}
132      [@option{-u}|@option{--unconditional-branches}]
133 @c man end
134 @c man begin SEEALSO
135 gpl(7), gfdl(7), fsf-funding(7), gcc(1) and the Info entry for @file{gcc}.
136 @c man end
137 @end ignore
138
139 @c man begin OPTIONS
140 @table @gcctabopt
141 @item -h
142 @itemx --help
143 Display help about using @command{gcov} (on the standard output), and
144 exit without doing any further processing.
145
146 @item -v
147 @itemx --version
148 Display the @command{gcov} version number (on the standard output),
149 and exit without doing any further processing.
150
151 @item -a
152 @itemx --all-blocks
153 Write individual execution counts for every basic block.  Normally gcov
154 outputs execution counts only for the main blocks of a line.  With this
155 option you can determine if blocks within a single line are not being
156 executed.
157
158 @item -b
159 @itemx --branch-probabilities
160 Write branch frequencies to the output file, and write branch summary
161 info to the standard output.  This option allows you to see how often
162 each branch in your program was taken.  Unconditional branches will not
163 be shown, unless the @option{-u} option is given.
164
165 @item -c
166 @itemx --branch-counts
167 Write branch frequencies as the number of branches taken, rather than
168 the percentage of branches taken.
169
170 @item -n
171 @itemx --no-output
172 Do not create the @command{gcov} output file.
173
174 @item -l
175 @itemx --long-file-names
176 Create long file names for included source files.  For example, if the
177 header file @file{x.h} contains code, and was included in the file
178 @file{a.c}, then running @command{gcov} on the file @file{a.c} will produce
179 an output file called @file{a.c##x.h.gcov} instead of @file{x.h.gcov}.
180 This can be useful if @file{x.h} is included in multiple source
181 files.  If you use the @samp{-p} option, both the including and
182 included file names will be complete path names.
183
184 @item -p
185 @itemx --preserve-paths
186 Preserve complete path information in the names of generated
187 @file{.gcov} files.  Without this option, just the filename component is
188 used.  With this option, all directories are used, with @samp{/} characters
189 translated to @samp{#} characters, @file{.} directory components
190 removed and @file{..}
191 components renamed to @samp{^}.  This is useful if sourcefiles are in several
192 different directories.  It also affects the @samp{-l} option.
193
194 @item -f
195 @itemx --function-summaries
196 Output summaries for each function in addition to the file level summary.
197
198 @item -o @var{directory|file}
199 @itemx --object-directory @var{directory}
200 @itemx --object-file @var{file}
201 Specify either the directory containing the gcov data files, or the
202 object path name.  The @file{.gcno}, and
203 @file{.gcda} data files are searched for using this option.  If a directory
204 is specified, the data files are in that directory and named after the
205 source file name, without its extension.  If a file is specified here,
206 the data files are named after that file, without its extension.  If this
207 option is not supplied, it defaults to the current directory.
208
209 @item -u
210 @itemx --unconditional-branches
211 When branch probabilities are given, include those of unconditional branches.
212 Unconditional branches are normally not interesting.
213
214 @end table
215
216 @command{gcov} should be run with the current directory the same as that
217 when you invoked the compiler.  Otherwise it will not be able to locate
218 the source files.  @command{gcov} produces files called
219 @file{@var{mangledname}.gcov} in the current directory.  These contain
220 the coverage information of the source file they correspond to.
221 One @file{.gcov} file is produced for each source file containing code,
222 which was compiled to produce the data files.  The @var{mangledname} part
223 of the output file name is usually simply the source file name, but can
224 be something more complicated if the @samp{-l} or @samp{-p} options are
225 given.  Refer to those options for details.
226
227 The @file{.gcov} files contain the @samp{:} separated fields along with
228 program source code.  The format is
229
230 @smallexample
231 @var{execution_count}:@var{line_number}:@var{source line text}
232 @end smallexample
233
234 Additional block information may succeed each line, when requested by
235 command line option.  The @var{execution_count} is @samp{-} for lines
236 containing no code and @samp{#####} for lines which were never executed.
237 Some lines of information at the start have @var{line_number} of zero.
238
239 The preamble lines are of the form
240
241 @smallexample
242 -:0:@var{tag}:@var{value}
243 @end smallexample
244
245 The ordering and number of these preamble lines will be augmented as
246 @command{gcov} development progresses --- do not rely on them remaining
247 unchanged.  Use @var{tag} to locate a particular preamble line.
248
249 The additional block information is of the form
250
251 @smallexample
252 @var{tag} @var{information}
253 @end smallexample
254
255 The @var{information} is human readable, but designed to be simple
256 enough for machine parsing too.
257
258 When printing percentages, 0% and 100% are only printed when the values
259 are @emph{exactly} 0% and 100% respectively.  Other values which would
260 conventionally be rounded to 0% or 100% are instead printed as the
261 nearest non-boundary value.
262
263 When using @command{gcov}, you must first compile your program with two
264 special GCC options: @samp{-fprofile-arcs -ftest-coverage}.
265 This tells the compiler to generate additional information needed by
266 gcov (basically a flow graph of the program) and also includes
267 additional code in the object files for generating the extra profiling
268 information needed by gcov.  These additional files are placed in the
269 directory where the object file is located.
270
271 Running the program will cause profile output to be generated.  For each
272 source file compiled with @option{-fprofile-arcs}, an accompanying
273 @file{.gcda} file will be placed in the object file directory.
274
275 Running @command{gcov} with your program's source file names as arguments
276 will now produce a listing of the code along with frequency of execution
277 for each line.  For example, if your program is called @file{tmp.c}, this
278 is what you see when you use the basic @command{gcov} facility:
279
280 @smallexample
281 $ gcc -fprofile-arcs -ftest-coverage tmp.c
282 $ a.out
283 $ gcov tmp.c
284 90.00% of 10 source lines executed in file tmp.c
285 Creating tmp.c.gcov.
286 @end smallexample
287
288 The file @file{tmp.c.gcov} contains output from @command{gcov}.
289 Here is a sample:
290
291 @smallexample
292         -:    0:Source:tmp.c
293         -:    0:Graph:tmp.gcno
294         -:    0:Data:tmp.gcda
295         -:    0:Runs:1
296         -:    0:Programs:1
297         -:    1:#include <stdio.h>
298         -:    2:
299         -:    3:int main (void)
300         1:    4:@{
301         1:    5:  int i, total;
302         -:    6:
303         1:    7:  total = 0;
304         -:    8:
305        11:    9:  for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
306        10:   10:    total += i;
307         -:   11:
308         1:   12:  if (total != 45)
309     #####:   13:    printf ("Failure\n");
310         -:   14:  else
311         1:   15:    printf ("Success\n");
312         1:   16:  return 0;
313         -:   17:@}
314 @end smallexample
315
316 When you use the @option{-a} option, you will get individual block
317 counts, and the output looks like this:
318
319 @smallexample
320         -:    0:Source:tmp.c
321         -:    0:Graph:tmp.gcno
322         -:    0:Data:tmp.gcda
323         -:    0:Runs:1
324         -:    0:Programs:1
325         -:    1:#include <stdio.h>
326         -:    2:
327         -:    3:int main (void)
328         1:    4:@{
329         1:    4-block  0
330         1:    5:  int i, total;
331         -:    6:
332         1:    7:  total = 0;
333         -:    8:
334        11:    9:  for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
335        11:    9-block  0
336        10:   10:    total += i;
337        10:   10-block  0
338         -:   11:
339         1:   12:  if (total != 45)
340         1:   12-block  0
341     #####:   13:    printf ("Failure\n");
342     $$$$$:   13-block  0
343         -:   14:  else
344         1:   15:    printf ("Success\n");
345         1:   15-block  0
346         1:   16:  return 0;
347         1:   16-block  0
348         -:   17:@}
349 @end smallexample
350
351 In this mode, each basic block is only shown on one line -- the last
352 line of the block.  A multi-line block will only contribute to the
353 execution count of that last line, and other lines will not be shown
354 to contain code, unless previous blocks end on those lines.
355 The total execution count of a line is shown and subsequent lines show
356 the execution counts for individual blocks that end on that line.  After each
357 block, the branch and call counts of the block will be shown, if the
358 @option{-b} option is given.
359
360 Because of the way GCC instruments calls, a call count can be shown
361 after a line with no individual blocks.
362 As you can see, line 13 contains a basic block that was not executed.
363
364 @need 450
365 When you use the @option{-b} option, your output looks like this:
366
367 @smallexample
368 $ gcov -b tmp.c
369 90.00% of 10 source lines executed in file tmp.c
370 80.00% of 5 branches executed in file tmp.c
371 80.00% of 5 branches taken at least once in file tmp.c
372 50.00% of 2 calls executed in file tmp.c
373 Creating tmp.c.gcov.
374 @end smallexample
375
376 Here is a sample of a resulting @file{tmp.c.gcov} file:
377
378 @smallexample
379         -:    0:Source:tmp.c
380         -:    0:Graph:tmp.gcno
381         -:    0:Data:tmp.gcda
382         -:    0:Runs:1
383         -:    0:Programs:1
384         -:    1:#include <stdio.h>
385         -:    2:
386         -:    3:int main (void)
387 function main called 1 returned 1 blocks executed 75%
388         1:    4:@{
389         1:    5:  int i, total;
390         -:    6:
391         1:    7:  total = 0;
392         -:    8:
393        11:    9:  for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
394 branch  0 taken 91% (fallthrough)
395 branch  1 taken 9%
396        10:   10:    total += i;
397         -:   11:
398         1:   12:  if (total != 45)
399 branch  0 taken 0% (fallthrough)
400 branch  1 taken 100%
401     #####:   13:    printf ("Failure\n");
402 call    0 never executed
403         -:   14:  else
404         1:   15:    printf ("Success\n");
405 call    0 called 1 returned 100%
406         1:   16:  return 0;
407         -:   17:@}
408 @end smallexample
409
410 For each function, a line is printed showing how many times the function
411 is called, how many times it returns and what percentage of the
412 function's blocks were executed.
413
414 For each basic block, a line is printed after the last line of the basic
415 block describing the branch or call that ends the basic block.  There can
416 be multiple branches and calls listed for a single source line if there
417 are multiple basic blocks that end on that line.  In this case, the
418 branches and calls are each given a number.  There is no simple way to map
419 these branches and calls back to source constructs.  In general, though,
420 the lowest numbered branch or call will correspond to the leftmost construct
421 on the source line.
422
423 For a branch, if it was executed at least once, then a percentage
424 indicating the number of times the branch was taken divided by the
425 number of times the branch was executed will be printed.  Otherwise, the
426 message ``never executed'' is printed.
427
428 For a call, if it was executed at least once, then a percentage
429 indicating the number of times the call returned divided by the number
430 of times the call was executed will be printed.  This will usually be
431 100%, but may be less for functions that call @code{exit} or @code{longjmp},
432 and thus may not return every time they are called.
433
434 The execution counts are cumulative.  If the example program were
435 executed again without removing the @file{.gcda} file, the count for the
436 number of times each line in the source was executed would be added to
437 the results of the previous run(s).  This is potentially useful in
438 several ways.  For example, it could be used to accumulate data over a
439 number of program runs as part of a test verification suite, or to
440 provide more accurate long-term information over a large number of
441 program runs.
442
443 The data in the @file{.gcda} files is saved immediately before the program
444 exits.  For each source file compiled with @option{-fprofile-arcs}, the
445 profiling code first attempts to read in an existing @file{.gcda} file; if
446 the file doesn't match the executable (differing number of basic block
447 counts) it will ignore the contents of the file.  It then adds in the
448 new execution counts and finally writes the data to the file.
449
450 @node Gcov and Optimization
451 @section Using @command{gcov} with GCC Optimization
452
453 If you plan to use @command{gcov} to help optimize your code, you must
454 first compile your program with two special GCC options:
455 @samp{-fprofile-arcs -ftest-coverage}.  Aside from that, you can use any
456 other GCC options; but if you want to prove that every single line
457 in your program was executed, you should not compile with optimization
458 at the same time.  On some machines the optimizer can eliminate some
459 simple code lines by combining them with other lines.  For example, code
460 like this:
461
462 @smallexample
463 if (a != b)
464   c = 1;
465 else
466   c = 0;
467 @end smallexample
468
469 @noindent
470 can be compiled into one instruction on some machines.  In this case,
471 there is no way for @command{gcov} to calculate separate execution counts
472 for each line because there isn't separate code for each line.  Hence
473 the @command{gcov} output looks like this if you compiled the program with
474 optimization:
475
476 @smallexample
477       100:   12:if (a != b)
478       100:   13:  c = 1;
479       100:   14:else
480       100:   15:  c = 0;
481 @end smallexample
482
483 The output shows that this block of code, combined by optimization,
484 executed 100 times.  In one sense this result is correct, because there
485 was only one instruction representing all four of these lines.  However,
486 the output does not indicate how many times the result was 0 and how
487 many times the result was 1.
488
489 Inlineable functions can create unexpected line counts.  Line counts are
490 shown for the source code of the inlineable function, but what is shown
491 depends on where the function is inlined, or if it is not inlined at all.
492
493 If the function is not inlined, the compiler must emit an out of line
494 copy of the function, in any object file that needs it.  If
495 @file{fileA.o} and @file{fileB.o} both contain out of line bodies of a
496 particular inlineable function, they will also both contain coverage
497 counts for that function.  When @file{fileA.o} and @file{fileB.o} are
498 linked together, the linker will, on many systems, select one of those
499 out of line bodies for all calls to that function, and remove or ignore
500 the other.  Unfortunately, it will not remove the coverage counters for
501 the unused function body.  Hence when instrumented, all but one use of
502 that function will show zero counts.
503
504 If the function is inlined in several places, the block structure in
505 each location might not be the same.  For instance, a condition might
506 now be calculable at compile time in some instances.  Because the
507 coverage of all the uses of the inline function will be shown for the
508 same source lines, the line counts themselves might seem inconsistent.
509
510 @c man end
511
512 @node Gcov Data Files
513 @section Brief description of @command{gcov} data files
514
515 @command{gcov} uses two files for profiling.  The names of these files
516 are derived from the original @emph{object} file by substituting the
517 file suffix with either @file{.gcno}, or @file{.gcda}.  All of these files
518 are placed in the same directory as the object file, and contain data
519 stored in a platform-independent format.
520
521 The @file{.gcno} file is generated when the source file is compiled with
522 the GCC @option{-ftest-coverage} option.  It contains information to
523 reconstruct the basic block graphs and assign source line numbers to
524 blocks.
525
526 The @file{.gcda} file is generated when a program containing object files
527 built with the GCC @option{-fprofile-arcs} option is executed.  A
528 separate @file{.gcda} file is created for each object file compiled with
529 this option.  It contains arc transition counts, and some summary
530 information.
531
532 The full details of the file format is specified in @file{gcov-io.h},
533 and functions provided in that header file should be used to access the
534 coverage files.
535
536 @node Cross-profiling
537 @section Data file relocation to support cross-profiling
538
539 Running the program will cause profile output to be generated.  For each 
540 source file compiled with @option{-fprofile-arcs}, an accompanying @file{.gcda} 
541 file will be placed in the object file directory. That implicitly requires 
542 running the program on the same system as it was built or having the same 
543 absolute directory structure on the target system. The program will try
544 to create the needed directory structure, if it is not already present.
545
546 To support cross-profiling, a program compiled with @option{-fprofile-arcs}
547 can relocate the data files based on two environment variables: 
548
549 @itemize @bullet
550 @item
551 GCOV_PREFIX contains the prefix to add to the absolute paths 
552 in the object file. Prefix must be absolute as well, otherwise its 
553 value is ignored. The default is no prefix.
554
555 @item
556 GCOV_PREFIX_STRIP indicates the how many initial directory names to strip off
557 the hardwired absolute paths. Default value is 0.
558
559 @emph{Note:} GCOV_PREFIX_STRIP has no effect if GCOV_PREFIX is undefined, empty
560 or non-absolute.
561 @end itemize
562
563 For example, if the object file @file{/user/build/foo.o} was built with
564 @option{-fprofile-arcs}, the final executable will try to create the data file
565 @file{/user/build/foo.gcda} when running on the target system.  This will
566 fail if the corresponding directory does not exist and it is unable to create
567 it.  This can be overcome by, for example, setting the environment as
568 @samp{GCOV_PREFIX=/target/run} and @samp{GCOV_PREFIX_STRIP=1}.  Such a
569 setting will name the data file @file{/target/run/build/foo.gcda}.
570
571 You must move the data files to the expected directory tree in order to
572 use them for profile directed optimizations (@option{--use-profile}), or to
573 use the @command{gcov} tool.